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Department of Geography

 

Political Ecology Group

Political Ecology Group

The Political Ecology Group is interested in all aspects of the symbolic and material politics of socially constructed natures. Its interests span the industrialised and developing world. Some members of the group are active in the Cambridge Conservation Initiative.

Meetings and seminars

The group meets weekly to discuss research in progress, to hear visiting speakers, or to discuss published papers.

Details of seminars are available.

Research opportunities

Members of the Political Ecology Group welcome applications from oost-doc researchers and potential PhD students in fields close to their own research, and to the work of existing Ph.D. students. Those interested should send a 300-600 word summary of their ideas for research to one of the staff in the group in the first instance.

Details about the Department's facilities for research students, and about application procedures may be found on the Graduate study web pages.

Political Ecology

Research projects

Research projects currently being undertaken on this theme include:

Rights to nature in post-crisis Europe: Tracing alternative political ecologies to the neoliberal environmental agenda through the study of emerging environmental movements

Rights to nature in post-crisis Europe: Tracing alternative political ecologies to the neoliberal environmental agenda through the study of emerging environmental movements

In this project, we aim to document and analyse the impacts of neoliberal attempts to exploit non-human nature in post-crisis Europe and the increasing opposition of emerging environmental movements. We focus on the alternative policy approach based on social needs and environmental justice that these movements demand. Following a political ecology approach the questions we aim to answer are: what kind of nature and thus society do these emerging movements wish to produce and for whom? Which alternative democratic systems are being proposed that could ensure more equal access to nature and more socially just distribution of environmental costs and benefits? What are the commonalities between localized struggles?

Can Hunting and Conservation of Endemic Annamite Ungulates be Reconciled?

Can Hunting and Conservation of Endemic Annamite Ungulates be Reconciled?

This project worked to inform more effective conservation of the globally important Annamite mountains. The Annamites, which are called Trýõng Sõn in Vietnamese and Phou Luang in Lao, line the border between these two nations. They are home to a unique, poorly-known and highly-threatened community of hoofed mammals (ungulates) including the critically endangered Saola Pseudoryx nghetinhensis. The main threat to these animals appears to be from hunting.

Earlier projects

Events

Previous special events have included: