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Department of Geography

 

Research seminars

Research seminars

Jump to: Main Departmental seminars | Cultural and Historical Geography | Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure | Conservation | Environmental Systems and Processes | Political ecology | Polar physical science | Histories, cultures, environments and politics research seminars | Gender | Quaternary Discussion Group (QDG) | Cambridge Volcanology | Cambridge Cultural and Historical Geography | Geographies of Knowledge | Biogeography and Biogeomorphology | Graduate Workshops in Economic and Social History | Graduate fieldwork seminar | Other talks | Reading groups

Directions to the Department are available.

Main Departmental seminar series

Main Departmental seminar series at the Department of Geography.

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Thursday 1st March 2018, 4.15pm - Professor Mike Hulme, Department of Geography, University of Cambridge
What sort of challenge is climate change? Fifty years of editorialising in ‘Nature’ and ‘Science’
Venue: Small Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography, Downing Site

Through their editorialising, leading international science journals such as Nature and Science shape and interpret the changing roles of science in society and exert considerable influence on scientific priorities and practices. I examine this ‘boundary work’ by examining 50 years of editorialising in these two journals through a longitudinal frame analysis of nearly 500 editorials. Although there are broad similarities between Nature and Science in the waxing and waning of editorialising attention given to climate change, there are also significant differences in how the challenges of climate change are framed. These differences can be attributed to these journals’ different institutional histories, place attachments and editorial styles. How Nature and Science editorialise climate change depends on where they are situated, both literally and metaphorically.

# Thursday 8th March 2018, 4.15pm - Dr Walter Immerzeel, Faculty of Geosciences, Universiteit Utrecht, The Netherlands
Recent advances in understanding climate, glacier and river dynamics in high mountain Asia
Venue: Small Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography, Downing Site

The water cycle in the Himalaya is poorly understood because of its extreme topography that results in complex interactions between climate, water stored in snow and glaciers and the hydrological processes. Hydrological extremes in the greater Himalayas regularly cause great damage, while high mountain Asia also supplies water to over 25% of the global population. So, the stakes are high and an accurate understanding of the Himalayan water cycle is imperative. The hydrology of the greater Himalayas is only marginally resolved due to the intricacy of monsoon dynamics, the poorly quantified dependence on the cryosphere and the physical constraints of doing research in high-altitude and generally inaccessible terrain. However, in recent years significant scientific advances have been made in field monitoring, modelling and remote sensing and the latest progress and outstanding challenges will be presented for three related fields. First focus will be on recent learnings about high altitude climate dynamics and the interaction between the atmosphere and the extreme mountain topography. Secondly, recent advances in how climate controls key glacio-hydrological processes in high-altitude catchments will be discussed with a particular focus on debris covered glaciers. Thirdly, new developments in glacio-hydrological modelling and approaches to climate change impact assessments will be reviewed. Finally, the outstanding scientific challenges will be synthesized that need to be addressed to fully close the high mountain water cycle and to be able to reduce the uncertainty in future projections of water availability and the occurrence of extreme events in high mountain Asia.

Seminars in Cultural and Historical Geography

All seminars begin at 1pm and take place in the Hardy Building, Room 101 (unless otherwise stated), Department of Geography. All welcome!

There are no forthcoming seminars at present. Please check back here later.

You may wish to view the archive of previous seminars.

The Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure - seminar series

Research seminar series run by the Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure.
The support of the Trevelyan Fund (Faculty of History) is gratefully acknowledged.

The seminar meets on Tuesdays at 4pm.

Convenors: Leigh Shaw-Taylor (lmws2@cam.ac.uk), Romola Davenport (rjd23@cam.ac.uk) and Alice Reid (alice.reid@geog.cam.ac.uk).

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Tuesday 6th March 2018, 4.00pm - Richard Smith (University of Cambridge)
Environmental shocks and demographic consequences in England: 1280-1325 and 1580-1640 compared
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Tuesday 8th May 2018, 4.00pm - Alan Fernihough (Queen's University Belfast)
Title to be confirmed
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

Cambridge Conservation Seminars

The series is intended to provide a research and social focus for university lecturers, research staff and postgraduate students interested in conservation research. The primary aim is to inform university colleagues of what research is going on in different departments and to bring in high quality outside speakers. Equally, members of conservation organisations are welcome to attend. A key element is the opportunity after each talk to socialise with colleagues from different departments and organisations.

Generously funded by the CCI Strategic Initiative Fund
http://www.conservation.cam.ac.uk/

There are no forthcoming seminars at present. Please check back here later.

You may wish to view the archive of previous seminars.

Climate and Environmental Dynamics - Department of Geography

Seminars which may be of interest to members of the Climate and Environmental Dynamics research group within the Department of Geography.

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Thursday 1st March 2018, 1.00pm - Francesco Muschitiello ( Department of Geography, University of Cambridge)
Deep-water circulation changes lead North Atlantic climate during deglaciation
Venue: Rm 101, William Hardy Building, Department of Geography, Downing Site

Constraining the response time of the climate system to changes in Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) is essential to improving future climate predictability. Here we present a precise synchronization of terrestrial, marine, and ice-core records, which allows for the first time a quantitative determination of the response time of North Atlantic climate to changes in AMOC strength during the last deglaciation. Using a continuous record of deep-water ventilation from the Nordic Seas, we identify a systematic ∼300-year lead of changes in deep-water convection ahead of abrupt climate changes recorded in Greenland ice cores at the onset and end of the Younger Dryas stadial (YD), which likely occurred in response to gradual changes in freshwater forcing. Supported by transient climate model simulations, our results also indicate a ~400-year delay in the rise of atmospheric CO2 in response to AMOC slowdown at the start of the YD. We conclude that variations in North Atlantic deep-water formation are precursors to large-scale climate and pCO2 changes, highlighting the need for improved long-term future AMOC projections.

# Thursday 8th March 2018, 4.15pm - Dr Walter Immerzeel, Faculty of Geosciences, Universiteit Utrecht, The Netherlands
Recent advances in understanding climate, glacier and river dynamics in high mountain Asia
Venue: Small Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography, Downing Site

The water cycle in the Himalaya is poorly understood because of its extreme topography that results in complex interactions between climate, water stored in snow and glaciers and the hydrological processes. Hydrological extremes in the greater Himalayas regularly cause great damage, while high mountain Asia also supplies water to over 25% of the global population. So, the stakes are high and an accurate understanding of the Himalayan water cycle is imperative. The hydrology of the greater Himalayas is only marginally resolved due to the intricacy of monsoon dynamics, the poorly quantified dependence on the cryosphere and the physical constraints of doing research in high-altitude and generally inaccessible terrain. However, in recent years significant scientific advances have been made in field monitoring, modelling and remote sensing and the latest progress and outstanding challenges will be presented for three related fields. First focus will be on recent learnings about high altitude climate dynamics and the interaction between the atmosphere and the extreme mountain topography. Secondly, recent advances in how climate controls key glacio-hydrological processes in high-altitude catchments will be discussed with a particular focus on debris covered glaciers. Thirdly, new developments in glacio-hydrological modelling and approaches to climate change impact assessments will be reviewed. Finally, the outstanding scientific challenges will be synthesized that need to be addressed to fully close the high mountain water cycle and to be able to reduce the uncertainty in future projections of water availability and the occurrence of extreme events in high mountain Asia.

# Thursday 8th March 2018, 4.15pm - Walter Immerzeel, University of Utrecht
This talk is part of the Department of Geography Seminar Series
Recent advances in understanding climate, glacier and river dynamics in high mountain Asia
Venue: Small Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography, Downing Site

The Himalayan water cycle is poorly understood because the extreme topography results in complex interactions between climate, water stored in snow and glaciers and the hydrological processes. An accurate understanding of this water cycle is imperative because hydrological extremes in the region regularly cause great damage, while high mountain Asia supplies water to over 25% of the global population. In recent years, significant advances have been made in field monitoring, modelling and remote sensing and in this talk, the latest progress will be presented focussing on three related fields. First, on high altitude climate dynamics and the interaction between the atmosphere and the extreme mountain topography. Second, on how climate controls key glacio-hydrological processes in high-altitude catchments with a particular focus on debris covered glaciers. Third, on glacio-hydrological modelling and approaches to climate change impact assessments. Finally, the talk will synthesize the outstanding scientific challenges that must be addressed to fully close the high mountain water cycle, thereby reducing the uncertainty in future projections of water availability and the occurrence of extreme events in high mountain Asia.

# Thursday 8th March 2018, 5.30pm - Barbara Maher, Lancaster University
Recent developments and debates in East Asian monsoon palaeoclimatology
Venue: Latimer Room (Old Court), Clare College, Trinity Lane

Quaternary Discussion Group seminar

# Friday 9th March 2018, 2.00pm - Lisa Bröder
Climate Environmental Dynamics Research Group Seminar
Quantifying transport time and degradation of terrigenous organic carbon across the East Siberian Arctic shelf
Venue: Small Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography, Downing Site

Permafrost soils in the Arctic store large quantities of organic matter, roughly twice the amount of carbon that was present in the atmosphere before the industrial revolution. This freeze-locked carbon pool is susceptible to thawing caused by amplified global warming at high latitudes. The remobilization of old permafrost carbon facilitates its degradation to carbon dioxide and methane, thereby providing a positive feedback to climate change.

Accelerating coastal erosion in addition to projected rising river discharge with enhancing sediment loads are anticipated to transport increasing amounts of land-derived organic carbon (OC) to the Arctic Ocean. On its shallow continental shelves, this material may be remineralized in the water column or in the sediments, transported without being altered off shelf towards the deep sea of the Arctic Interior or buried in marine sediments and hence sequestered from the contemporary carbon cycle. The fate of terrigenous material in the marine environment, though offering potentially important mechanisms to either strengthen or attenuate the permafrost-carbon climate feedback, is so far insufficiently understood.

We have used sediments from the wide East Siberian Arctic Shelf, the world’s largest shelf-sea system, to investigate some of the key processes for OC cycling. A range of bulk sediment properties, carbon isotopes and molecular markers were employed to elucidate the relative importance of different organic matter sources, the role of cross-shelf transport and the relevance of degradation during transport and after burial.

This talk focuses on how we can employ compound-specific radiocarbon analyses of terrestrial biomarkers to determine cross-shelf transport times and quantify degradation rates for terrigenous OC (terrOC). For the 600 km from the Lena River Delta to the Laptev Sea shelf edge our quantitative estimate resulted in 3600 ± 300 years. During transport, terrOC was reduced by ~85%, thus yielding a degradation rate constant of 2.4 ± 0.6 kyr-1. Hence, terrOC degradation during cross-shelf transport constitutes a carbon source to the atmosphere over millennial time. For the contemporary carbon cycle on the other hand, slow terrOC degradation brings considerable attenuation of the decadal-centennial permafrost carbon-climate feedback caused by global warming.

# Thursday 26th April 2018, 5.30pm - Denis-Didier Rousseau - Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique & CERES-ERTI
TBC
Venue: Bawden Room, West Court, Jesus College

Abstract not available

# Thursday 17th May 2018, 5.30pm - Joy Singarayer - University of Reading
TBC
Venue: Bawden Room, West Court, Jesus College

Abstract not available

Polar Physical Sciences

Histories, cultures, environments and politics research seminars

Quaternary Discussion Group (QDG)

A series of 50 minute lectures, followed by discussion, on the broad topic of environmental evolution, climate, ecological and human change during the Quaternary (the last ~2.6 million years). The lectures are aimed at a broad audience (including geoscientists, glaciologists, environmental scientists, atmospheric chemists, biologists, anthropologists and archaeologists).

Seminars are usually held on Thursdays starting at 17:30 in Clare College in the Latimer Room (on the left in the first court). Wine is served after the talks and there is time for discussion over drinks and/or dinner.

QDG is currently organised by Rachael Rhodes (rhr34@cam.ac.uk; Department of Earth Sciences), and Della Murton (dkf20@cam.ac.uk; Department of Zoology). Please feel free to contact the organisers with queries and suggestions.

A map showing of Clare College is available at http://www.clare.cam.ac.uk/Maps-and-Directions/

To sign up to the QDG mailing list, follow this link:
https://lists.cam.ac.uk/mailman/listinfo/soc-qdg-quaternary-disc-reminder

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Thursday 8th March 2018, 5.30pm - Barbara Maher, Lancaster University
Recent developments and debates in East Asian monsoon palaeoclimatology
Venue: Latimer Room (Old Court), Clare College, Trinity Lane

Quaternary Discussion Group seminar

# Thursday 26th April 2018, 5.30pm - Denis-Didier Rousseau - Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique & CERES-ERTI
TBC
Venue: Bawden Room, West Court, Jesus College

Abstract not available

# Thursday 17th May 2018, 5.30pm - Joy Singarayer - University of Reading
TBC
Venue: Bawden Room, West Court, Jesus College

Abstract not available

Cambridge Volcanology

Cambridge Volcanology seminars.

There are no forthcoming seminars at present. Please check back here later.

You may wish to view the archive of previous seminars.

Cambridge Cultural and Historical Geography (CCHG) - Department of Geography

Seminars and public lectures within the Cambridge Cultural and Historical Geography research group of the Department of Geography.

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Thursday 1st March 2018, 5.00pm - Dr Tawny Paul, University of Exeter, and Prof. Jeremy Boulton, University of Newcastle
Debtors’ schedules: a new source for understanding the economy in 18th-century England
Venue: History Faculty Room 12

Abstract not available

# Tuesday 6th March 2018, 4.00pm - Richard Smith (University of Cambridge)
Environmental shocks and demographic consequences in England: 1280-1325 and 1580-1640 compared
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Tuesday 13th March 2018, 4.00pm - Cheng Yang (University of Cambridge)
160 years of occupational structure: Late Imperial China and its regions
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Despite extensive debates around West-East divergence in economic developments before and during the Industrial Revolution, empirical evidence of China remains thin. Using Xingke Tiben (judicial records of Chinese homicide trials), a hitherto unused source for occupational data, a new occupational database has been created that comprises individual-level occupational data and other key variables; over 31,000 individuals in 8,000 randomly sampled Xingke Tiben from the Qing Empire’s 320 prefectures in 1736-1898 are recorded. This paper discusses the core methodology (assessment of the inherent biases; reweighting) and key results of reconstructing the occupational structure of China and its regions from this database.

# Thursday 26th April 2018, 5.00pm - Matthew Pawelski, University of Lancaster
Title to be confirmed
Venue: History Faculty Room 9

Abstract not available

# Thursday 3rd May 2018, 5.00pm - Eleanor Robson, University of Cambridge
Title to be confirmed
Venue: History Faculty Room 9

Abstract not available

# Tuesday 8th May 2018, 4.00pm - Alan Fernihough (Queen's University Belfast)
Title to be confirmed
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Thursday 10th May 2018, 5.00pm - Kathryn Gary, University of Lund
Title to be confirmed
Venue: History Faculty Room 9

Abstract not available

Geographies of Knowledge - Department of Geography

Seminars and public lectures within the Geographies of Knowledge research group of the Department of Geography.

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Monday 26th February 2018, 4.30pm - Richard Powell (University of Cambridge)
BOOK LAUNCH: Studying Arctic Fields: Cultures, Practices, and Environmental Sciences
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Lecture Theatre

This event is the Launch for Richard Powell’s new book, Studying Arctic Fields: Cultures, Practices, and Environmental Sciences, and is kindly sponsored by the Independent Social Research Foundation and McGill-Queen’s University Press. Please RSVP [jenny.dunstall@spri.cam.ac.uk] to attend.

# Thursday 1st March 2018, 4.15pm - Professor Mike Hulme, Department of Geography, University of Cambridge
What sort of challenge is climate change? Fifty years of editorialising in ‘Nature’ and ‘Science’
Venue: Small Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography, Downing Site

Through their editorialising, leading international science journals such as Nature and Science shape and interpret the changing roles of science in society and exert considerable influence on scientific priorities and practices. I examine this ‘boundary work’ by examining 50 years of editorialising in these two journals through a longitudinal frame analysis of nearly 500 editorials. Although there are broad similarities between Nature and Science in the waxing and waning of editorialising attention given to climate change, there are also significant differences in how the challenges of climate change are framed. These differences can be attributed to these journals’ different institutional histories, place attachments and editorial styles. How Nature and Science editorialise climate change depends on where they are situated, both literally and metaphorically.

Biogeography and Biogeomorphology - Department of Geography

Seminars and public lectures within the Biogeography and Biogeomorphology research group of the Department of Geography.

There are no forthcoming seminars at present. Please check back here later.

You may wish to view the archive of previous seminars.

Fieldwork Seminar: Methodologies in the 'field'

These seminars at the Department of Geography are based on reflections from recently undertaken (though this is not essential) fieldwork, and will engage with the challenges of fieldwork, and the contradictions between methodology as we understand it in abstraction, and what plays out in the field.

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Tuesday 6th March 2018, 11.00am - Sibylla Warrington (Department of Geography)
Ñande reko: alterity and (non-)participatory research with guaraní women in Bolivia
Venue: Seminar Room, Department of Geography, Downing Site

Participatory research aims to involve participants as active collaborators and challenge power differentials in the production of knowledge. Participatory approaches have also been central to decolonial and feminist research. However, what are the problems in using selected participatory methods as an ‘add-on’ to an already elaborated research project, and what should we do when the participatory process breaks down? How can the research remain relevant to the lives and concerns of the participants, and ultimately remain ethical – particularly when working with disadvantaged communities and intersectional inequalities? This talk will discuss some challenges and ethical issues encountered in (non-)participatory research with indigenous women in Bolivia.

# Tuesday 13th March 2018, 11.00am - Geography PhD students
First year PhD student fieldwork seminar
Venue: TBC (Department of Geography)

An interactive round-table where first-year PhDs will make short presentations on a methodological or broader fieldwork issue, conundrum or reflection that they’ve already encountered, or believe they may encounter, when out in ‘the field’. The presentations will then become the basis on a further discussion about these potential challenges, together with other graduate students at different stages of their work.

Graduate Workshops in Economic and Social History

All talks take place on Mondays at 12.30 pm in Room 5, Faculty of History, West Road.

All welcome. A complimentary sandwich lunch is provided.

Convenors: Josh Ivinson and Emiliano Travieso.

There are no forthcoming seminars at present. Please check back here later.

You may wish to view the archive of previous seminars.

Other talks

Talks in the Department of Geography not connected to any other seminar series.

There are no forthcoming seminars at present. Please check back here later.

You may wish to view the archive of previous seminars.