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Department of Geography

 

Research seminars

Research seminars

Jump to: Main Departmental seminars | Cultural and Historical Geography | Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure | Conservation | Environmental Systems and Processes | Political ecology | Polar physical science | Histories, cultures, environments and politics research seminars | Polar Humanities and Social Sciences Graduate Workshop | Gender | Quaternary Discussion Group (QDG) | Cambridge Volcanology | Cambridge Cultural and Historical Geography | Geographies of Knowledge | Infrastructural Geographies | Biogeography and Biogeomorphology | Graduate Workshops in Economic and Social History | Centenary Lecture Series | ERC Research Presentations | Other talks | Reading groups

Directions to the Department are available.

Main Departmental seminar series

Main Departmental seminar series at the Department of Geography.

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Thursday 8th November 2018, 4.15pm - Dr Ivan Haigh, Ocean and Earth Science, National Oceanography Centre Southampton at the University of Southampton
Is sea level rise accelerating and what are the implications for coastal flooding?
Venue: Small Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography, Downing Site

Sea-level rise is one of the most certain and costliest impacts of climate change. The Paris Agreement committed signatories to ‘Holding the increase in the global average temperature to well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels and to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels recognizing that this would significantly reduce the risks and impacts of climate change’. However, while reducing human emissions of greenhouse gases will stabilise temperature and other climate factors, sea-level rise will continue for many centuries. This is due to the long timescale of cryospheric adjustment to elevated air temperatures (especially the large ice sheets), and the long timescale of the deep ocean temperature warming to surface warming. In this presentation I will describe a novel approach we have developed to project sea-level rise out to 2300 to accurately assess our ‘commitment to sea-level rise’. I will then go on to describe how sea level rise will impact coastal flooding around the UK.

Ivan Haigh is an associated professor in Ocean and Earth Science, University of Southampton, based at the prestigious National Oceanography Centre, Southampton. He is passionate about all things relating to sea level. Him and his team investigate variations in sea level from time-scales of seconds (waves), to days (tides and storm surges), through to long-term century scale rises in mean sea level, and its impact on the coast.

# Thursday 31st January 2019, 4.15pm - Professor Declan Conway, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, The London School of Economics and Political Science
Climate change and water security in Africa
Venue: Small Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography, Downing Site

Abstract not available

Seminars in Cultural and Historical Geography

All seminars begin at 1pm and take place in the Hardy Building, Room 101 (unless otherwise stated), Department of Geography. All welcome!

There are no forthcoming seminars at present. Please check back here later.

You may wish to view the archive of previous seminars.

The Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure - seminar series

Research seminar series run by the Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure.
The support of the Trevelyan Fund (Faculty of History) is gratefully acknowledged.

The seminar meets on Tuesdays at 4pm.

Convenors: Leigh Shaw-Taylor (lmws2@cam.ac.uk), Romola Davenport (rjd23@cam.ac.uk) and Alice Reid (alice.reid@geog.cam.ac.uk).

There are no forthcoming seminars at present. Please check back here later.

You may wish to view the archive of previous seminars.

Cambridge Conservation Seminars

The series is intended to provide a research and social focus for university lecturers, research staff and postgraduate students interested in conservation research. The primary aim is to inform university colleagues of what research is going on in different departments and to bring in high quality outside speakers. Equally, members of conservation organisations are welcome to attend. A key element is the opportunity after each talk to socialise with colleagues from different departments and organisations.

Generously funded by the CCI Strategic Initiative Fund
http://www.conservation.cam.ac.uk/

There are no forthcoming seminars at present. Please check back here later.

You may wish to view the archive of previous seminars.

Climate and Environmental Dynamics - Department of Geography

Seminars which may be of interest to members of the Climate and Environmental Dynamics research group within the Department of Geography.

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Thursday 1st November 2018, 1.00pm - Dr Nick Blegen, University of Cambridge
World Enough & Time: Tephrostratigraphy and Modern Human Evolution in Middle-Late Pleistocene East Africa
Venue: William Hardy Building, Room 101, Department of Geography, Downing Site

Abstract not available

# Thursday 1st November 2018, 5.30pm - Dr Mario Krapp (Department of Zoology)
A comprehensive climate history of the last 800,000 years and its application to ecological modelling
Venue: Cripps Meeting Room 3, Magdalene College

Understanding ecosystems and their evolution through the climate of the Pleistocene ice ages requires detailed palaeo-climate reconstructions.
Global climate models (GCM) are frequently used to explore the many diverse aspect of past climates. However, due to their high computational demand a continuous and spatially detailed exploration of the past remains elusive. In this talk, I will present a GCM emulator, which is based on climate snapshot simulations of the last 120ka, that allows us to reconstruct the climate of the last 800,000 years (and
beyond) in a quasi-continuous way. I will show how the predictive skill of the GCM emulator can be tested against existing Pleistocene climate proxies and I will present a few highlights of how such an emulator can be used for ecological modelling, for example, the dispersal of anatomically modern humans out of Africa.

# Thursday 15th November 2018, 1.00pm - Prof Hans Linderholm, University of Gothenburg
Climate and human health in the last two millennia
Venue: William Hardy Building, Room 101, Department of Geography, Downing Site

Abstract not available

# Thursday 22nd November 2018, 5.30pm - Prof. Francois Primeau (University of California Irvine, USA)
Global Estimates of Marine Nitrogen Fixation based on a Non-Redfield Inverse Model
Venue: Latimer Room, Clare College

Abstract not available

Polar Physical Sciences

Histories, cultures, environments and politics research seminars

Quaternary Discussion Group (QDG)

A series of 50 minute lectures, followed by discussion, on the broad topic of environmental evolution, climate, ecological and human change during the Quaternary (the last ~2.6 million years). The lectures are aimed at a broad audience (including geoscientists, glaciologists, environmental scientists, atmospheric chemists, biologists, anthropologists and archaeologists).

Seminars are on Thursdays starting at 17:30. Wine is served after the talks and there is time for discussion over drinks and/or dinner.

QDG is currently organised by Luke Skinner (luke00@cam.ac.uk). Please feel free to contact him with queries and suggestions.

To sign up to the QDG mailing list, follow this link:
https://lists.cam.ac.uk/mailman/listinfo/soc-qdg-quaternary-disc-reminder

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Thursday 1st November 2018, 5.30pm - Dr Mario Krapp (Department of Zoology)
A comprehensive climate history of the last 800,000 years and its application to ecological modelling
Venue: Cripps Meeting Room 3, Magdalene College

Understanding ecosystems and their evolution through the climate of the Pleistocene ice ages requires detailed palaeo-climate reconstructions.
Global climate models (GCM) are frequently used to explore the many diverse aspect of past climates. However, due to their high computational demand a continuous and spatially detailed exploration of the past remains elusive. In this talk, I will present a GCM emulator, which is based on climate snapshot simulations of the last 120ka, that allows us to reconstruct the climate of the last 800,000 years (and
beyond) in a quasi-continuous way. I will show how the predictive skill of the GCM emulator can be tested against existing Pleistocene climate proxies and I will present a few highlights of how such an emulator can be used for ecological modelling, for example, the dispersal of anatomically modern humans out of Africa.

# Thursday 22nd November 2018, 5.30pm - Prof. Francois Primeau (University of California Irvine, USA)
Global Estimates of Marine Nitrogen Fixation based on a Non-Redfield Inverse Model
Venue: Latimer Room, Clare College

Abstract not available

Cambridge Volcanology

Cambridge Volcanology seminars.

There are no forthcoming seminars at present. Please check back here later.

You may wish to view the archive of previous seminars.

Cambridge Cultural and Historical Geography (CCHG) - Department of Geography

Seminars and public lectures within the Cambridge Cultural and Historical Geography research group of the Department of Geography.

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Monday 22nd October 2018, 12.30pm - Yiwen Qiu (University of Cambridge)
Industrial development paths from an evolutionary perspective: the Chinese case, 1998-2013
Venue: Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Thursday 25th October 2018, 5.00pm - Professor Patrick O’Brien (London School of Economics)
Britain's wars with France, 1793-1815 and their contribution to the consolidation of the Industrial Revolution
Venue: Old Library, Darwin College

Abstract not available

# Monday 29th October 2018, 12.30pm - Yushu Geng (University of Cambridge)
Obscenity and the Politics of Moral Regulation in China and Singapore, 1919-1937
Venue: Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 5th November 2018, 12.30pm - Yasmin Shearmur (University of Cambridge)
European integration and immigration policy, French and British experiences, 1976-1992
Venue: Room 5, Faculty of History

This paper examines the making of immigration policy in France and Britain during the 1980s. More  specifically, it examines whether and how European developments fed back into domestic immigration policy. Beginning in the late 1970s and carrying throughout the 1980s, there was a burst of activity at the European level, from the informal, intergovernmental cooperation between interior ministers of the TREVI group; to the Schengen agreements, which abolished internal borders for participating countries; to Maastricht, which incorporated developments of the previous decade into expanded and formalized EU structures.  What, historically, have France and Britain’s priorities regarding immigration been? How is immigration policy made, given that it must respond to contrary imperatives, even within government? Does modern immigration policy reflect Europe’s democratic deficit? How well have states ever been able to implement immigration policy? If poorly, what function does declaring an immigration policy serve? 

# Monday 12th November 2018, 12.30pm - Michalis Bardanis (University of Ioannina, Greece)
Brick and tile making in Athens, Greece, during 20th century
Venue: Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Thursday 15th November 2018, 5.00pm - Dr Justyna Wubs-Mrozewicz (University of Amsterdam)
Conflict management in northern Europe, 1350-1570
Venue: Old Library, Darwin College

Abstract not available

# Monday 19th November 2018, 12.30pm - Mostafa Abdelaal (University of Cambridge)
Years of Turbulence, Years of Hope: Central African Copperbelt and the Industrial Development in Congo-Léopoldville and Zambia, from the Political Independence to the Economic Nationalization
Venue: Room 5, Faculty of History

The economic nationalization occurred in Congo-Léopoldville and Zambia roughly after five years of their independence, in 1966 and 1969 respectively.  During the political clouts and the economic vicissitudes that took place in both countries, the Central African Copperbelt (CAC) contributed to a far extent in shaping the historical events. However, these fateful years lie between the political independence to the nationalization of mining companies have been received little attention from historians.  The quest for Africanization the economy and from the European domination became extremely fiercer than the political independence. A group of factors explain the challenges faced by national governments in dirigisme their national economy such as; the global economic relationships, capital flight and foreign direct investment, global copper prices, Africa’s lacking to the technical experience and management of mining companies. This paper will investigate the colonial/national perceptions of industrial development in late colonial/ the immediate post-colonial years, more specifically the weight of the CAC in the colonial/national contexts, from development planning to implementation. A part of this perception could be traced since the colonial authorities Belgians/British set up decennial developmental plans in the 1940s and 50s which extended to another long-term plan but was curtailed by the advent of independence. On the other hand, the national authorities replaced these plans with the transnational and first development plans in Zambia and a chaotic political situation in Congo. Significantly, there were high expectations by African in both countries for reaping the benefits of independence, higher wages and advancement of labour, and this might explain the crucial role of mining areas. Such a role need to be examined from comparative contexts, not limited to the mining industry, but significantly to the CAC role in the question of industrial development in the early years of independence.

# Thursday 22nd November 2018, 5.00pm - Dr Eilidh Garrett (Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure)
Movers and stayers: populations, movement and measurement in historical demography
Venue: Old Library, Darwin College

Abstract not available

# Monday 26th November 2018, 12.30pm - Alex Tertzakian (University of Cambridge)
The diffusion of mechanised technologies in the West Riding of Yorkshire textile industry c.1780­‐1911 and its impact on employment and wages
Venue: Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Thursday 29th November 2018, 5.00pm - Professor John Styles (University of Hertfordshire)
Inducements to technical innovation in the British Industrial Revolution: markets, materiality and the invention of the spinning jenny
Venue: Old Library, Darwin College

Abstract not available

Geographies of Knowledge - Department of Geography

Seminars and public lectures within the Geographies of Knowledge research group of the Department of Geography.

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Tuesday 30th October 2018, 4.30pm - Brice Perombelon (University of Oxford)
From animism to speculation: representations of geopower among the Dene of Tulita, Northwest Territories, Canada
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Lecture Theatre

Abstract not available

# Tuesday 13th November 2018, 4.30pm - Adrian Howkins (University of Bristol)
Antarctic Mosaic: Integrating Science and History in the McMurdo Dry Valleys
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Lecture Theatre

Abstract not available

# Tuesday 29th January 2019, 4.30pm - Jon Oldfield (University of Birmingham)
The role of the Arctic in the development of Soviet climate science
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Lecture Theatre

Abstract not available

# Tuesday 5th March 2019, 4.30pm - Eleanor Rosamund Barraclough (Durham University)
'As Far North As Whale Hunters Go': The Medieval Arctic Environment, Experienced and Imagined
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Lecture Theatre

Abstract not available

# Tuesday 12th March 2019, 4.30pm - Nancy Wachowich (University of Aberdeen)
Mittimatalik Arnait Miqsuqtuit Collective and the Art of Sealskin Sewing
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Lecture Theatre

Abstract not available

# Tuesday 14th May 2019, 4.30pm - Dorothea Wehrmann (Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik)
Critical Geopolitics of the Polar Regions: An Inter-American Perspective
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Lecture Theatre

Abstract not available

Biogeography and Biogeomorphology - Department of Geography

Seminars and public lectures within the Biogeography and Biogeomorphology research group of the Department of Geography.

There are no forthcoming seminars at present. Please check back here later.

You may wish to view the archive of previous seminars.

Infrastructural Geographies - Department of Geography

Seminars and public lectures within the Infrastructural Geographies research group of the Department of Geography.

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Tuesday 23rd October 2018, 5.30pm - Tim Edensor, Manchester Metropolitan University
City Seminar: Tim Edensor: Commemorating the Past in Stone: Destabilizing Melbourne's Memoryscape
Venue: Seminar Room, Department of Geography, Downing Site

Commemorating the Past in Stone: Destabilizing Melbourne’s Memoryscape
Tim Edensor, Manchester Metropolitan University

This talk explores the multiple ways in which stone has been deployed to mark the past. It will look at how a specific area of Melbourne’s urban realm has been assigned as a site of commemoration, featuring a plethora of colonial and military memorials, elements that also recur throughout the centre of the city. Tim will then discuss how the presence of other stony forms of commemoration increasingly supplement and talk back to these archetypal monuments to war and elite men, especially through the recent installation of Aboriginal artworks and memorials. We may also contest these clichéd commemorative forms, he will argue, by paying attention to the numerous ways in which stone is also haunted by traces of the past, whether geological, environmental, industrial or mundane.

The City Seminar, co-convened by the Department of Geography along with the Department of Architecture, explores the theme of ‘Infrastructures of Memory’ this year. A diverse line-up of speakers – including geographers, anthropologists, architects, artists and activists – will examine the various techniques, technologies, rituals, performances and materialities of memory and remembrance, and how they reinforce or subvert prevailing power relations.

Fieldwork Seminar: Methodologies in the 'field'

These seminars at the Department of Geography are based on reflections from recently undertaken (though this is not essential) fieldwork, and will engage with the challenges of fieldwork, and the contradictions between methodology as we understand it in abstraction, and what plays out in the field.

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Tuesday 23rd October 2018, 11.00am - Tanvi Bhatkal, Department of Geography
Managing participation and relationships in the field
Venue: Seminar Room, Department of Geography, Downing Site

My research explores gendered perceptions of inclusion/exclusion in urban public spaces in marginal areas of Mumbai. I first began fieldwork hoping to employ participatory methods where participants help shape the research agenda and process – a key approach in feminist research. However, this posed some problems: among them, it assumed the existence of a ‘community’ which was sometimes an elusive concept; and participants often didn’t have the time or inclination to critically engage with research that they felt didn’t directly concern their everyday lives. In such cases, how can research seek participation, or at least ensure solidarity with the concerns of participants? With those that got somewhat involved, long informal conversations both produced rich data and feedback for the research as well as built friendships. Here, how do you deal with ensuing relationship dynamics, when building friendships that also serve as sources of research data? This talk will discuss some of the ethical and emotional/mental issues I encountered, which I hope will help others avoid (or at least be more prepared for) some of the dilemmas I faced in the field.

# Tuesday 30th October 2018, 10.00am - Anne Alexander (CRASSH), Sebastian Haug, Phil Howell, Francesca Moore, Nida Rehman & Sipke Shaughnessy
Archival Methods Forum
Venue: Seminar Room, Department of Geography, Downing Site

Recognising the importance archival research may have before, after, or during a period of fieldwork, this half-day forum will see PhD students and senior members of staff reflect on their own archival research practice, and the personal as well as wider academic conundrums that are brought about by questions of access, posthumous consent, sensitive discoveries, archival digitisation, gendered and non-human ‘silences’, among many other things. (Sign up required)

# Tuesday 13th November 2018, 11.00am - Giulia Torino, Department of Architecture
Researching otherwise: some reflections on the decolonisation of research practice (and production of knowledge), beyond extractivism and epistemicide
Venue: Seminar Room, Department of Geography, Downing Site

Over four years of academic research in the field of urbanism in Bogotá, I have been facing very different reactions to my presence in Colombia, let alone to my more recent engagement with my doctoral research topic: racial segregation and spatial injustice — astonishingly still a public taboo, in a country which hosts the third greatest Afro-descendant population of the Americas. The spectrum of reactions received has encompassed almost anything in-between disbelief vis-á-vis my ten-year interest in the country (“but you are Italian, why would you come to study Colombia?!”), and epistemic revulsion vis-á-vis the embodied practice of my research (“how can a white and European researcher understand anything about the condition of Afro-Colombians in Bogotá!”). On the one hand, this informal talk aims to be nothing more than a self-reflected and hopefully critical personal account on some years of research practice in Bogotá and the risks (when not the actual performances) of perpetuating unequal power relations from the European academia, along a “global North” – “global South” axis, through academic extractivism in local communities and neo-colonialist epistemicide of “knowledges otherwise” (Escobar, 2007); especially in a country like Colombia, still widely devoted to intellectual eurocentrism and racial hierarchies. On the other hand, it wishes to interrogate those “knowledges otherwise” emerged from the field: how can we theorise over and from them in the academia? What shall we give back to them, through our academic work? And, finally, which axiological evaluation can we derive from a non-ethnocidal approach to the empirical knowledges emerged from the field? 

# Tuesday 27th November 2018, 11.00am - Shreyashi Dasgupta, Centre of Development Studies
‘Doing’ comparative research in South Asia: Positionality, postcolonial cities and the making of urban place
Venue: Seminar Room, Department of Geography, Downing Site

There is a substantive literature on comparative work from various epistemological standpoints in urban studies (Robinson 2014, Scott and Storper 2015). The idea of comparative urban research seeks to transcend the boundaries of a single-city perspective. But as McFarlane (2010) points out that comparative work has often been understood in relation to cities between the Global North and Global South but a more postcolonial debate considers comparativism as a research and mode of thought. At the core of the ‘doing’ comparative urban research entails the challenge of the researcher. However, scanty literature focuses directly on the process of producing South-South comparability, positionality of researchers and the methodologies and ethical dilemmas of the ethnographic self. In this presentation, I will explore two important questions – First, what does it mean to be a South Asian researcher doing comparative contemporary urban research in South Asia? I will elaborate this by unpacking the connections between South Asian cities from two neighbouring nation-states, look at the process of comparative research once the historical place has geographically moved beyond a single city, nation-state or region (Reference Kenny and Magdin 2015). Second, I will address the impact of insider-outsider positionality on collected data. I will elaborate on this by highlighting the ethnographic self, issues of intersectionality between caste, religion, migrant and a researcher trained in the UK doing research on South Asia. To advance my arguments, I will make use of interviews and observational data gathered to understand the influences of the identities and geographies of the researcher on their work.

Graduate Workshops in Economic and Social History

Mondays at 12:30 pm in Room 5, Faculty of History, West Road (except 15th October in Room 6)

All welcome. A complimentary sandwich lunch is provided.

Convenors: Ying Dai (Murray Edwards College,yd282) and Emelyn Rude (King’s College, er496)

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Monday 22nd October 2018, 12.30pm - Yiwen Qiu (University of Cambridge)
Industrial development paths from an evolutionary perspective: the Chinese case, 1998-2013
Venue: Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 29th October 2018, 12.30pm - Yushu Geng (University of Cambridge)
Obscenity and the Politics of Moral Regulation in China and Singapore, 1919-1937
Venue: Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 5th November 2018, 12.30pm - Yasmin Shearmur (University of Cambridge)
European integration and immigration policy, French and British experiences, 1976-1992
Venue: Room 5, Faculty of History

This paper examines the making of immigration policy in France and Britain during the 1980s. More  specifically, it examines whether and how European developments fed back into domestic immigration policy. Beginning in the late 1970s and carrying throughout the 1980s, there was a burst of activity at the European level, from the informal, intergovernmental cooperation between interior ministers of the TREVI group; to the Schengen agreements, which abolished internal borders for participating countries; to Maastricht, which incorporated developments of the previous decade into expanded and formalized EU structures.  What, historically, have France and Britain’s priorities regarding immigration been? How is immigration policy made, given that it must respond to contrary imperatives, even within government? Does modern immigration policy reflect Europe’s democratic deficit? How well have states ever been able to implement immigration policy? If poorly, what function does declaring an immigration policy serve? 

# Monday 12th November 2018, 12.30pm - Michalis Bardanis (University of Ioannina, Greece)
Brick and tile making in Athens, Greece, during 20th century
Venue: Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 19th November 2018, 12.30pm - Mostafa Abdelaal (University of Cambridge)
Years of Turbulence, Years of Hope: Central African Copperbelt and the Industrial Development in Congo-Léopoldville and Zambia, from the Political Independence to the Economic Nationalization
Venue: Room 5, Faculty of History

The economic nationalization occurred in Congo-Léopoldville and Zambia roughly after five years of their independence, in 1966 and 1969 respectively.  During the political clouts and the economic vicissitudes that took place in both countries, the Central African Copperbelt (CAC) contributed to a far extent in shaping the historical events. However, these fateful years lie between the political independence to the nationalization of mining companies have been received little attention from historians.  The quest for Africanization the economy and from the European domination became extremely fiercer than the political independence. A group of factors explain the challenges faced by national governments in dirigisme their national economy such as; the global economic relationships, capital flight and foreign direct investment, global copper prices, Africa’s lacking to the technical experience and management of mining companies. This paper will investigate the colonial/national perceptions of industrial development in late colonial/ the immediate post-colonial years, more specifically the weight of the CAC in the colonial/national contexts, from development planning to implementation. A part of this perception could be traced since the colonial authorities Belgians/British set up decennial developmental plans in the 1940s and 50s which extended to another long-term plan but was curtailed by the advent of independence. On the other hand, the national authorities replaced these plans with the transnational and first development plans in Zambia and a chaotic political situation in Congo. Significantly, there were high expectations by African in both countries for reaping the benefits of independence, higher wages and advancement of labour, and this might explain the crucial role of mining areas. Such a role need to be examined from comparative contexts, not limited to the mining industry, but significantly to the CAC role in the question of industrial development in the early years of independence.

# Monday 26th November 2018, 12.30pm - Alex Tertzakian (University of Cambridge)
The diffusion of mechanised technologies in the West Riding of Yorkshire textile industry c.1780­‐1911 and its impact on employment and wages
Venue: Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

Centenary Lecture Series, Department of Geography

Description to be confirmed

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Thursday 25th October 2018, 5.00pm - Professor Linda McDowell, School of Geography and the Environment, Oxford University
Border crossings: geographies of class, gender, mobility and migration
Venue: Large Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography, Downing Site

The focus of the talk is on the personal and academic implications of some of the significant changes in the UK economy and society, as well as in the nature of geography as a discipline, over the last half century. The key theme is mobility and migration, within and between countries, as well as across class boundaries, as the UK became a more diverse country from the end of World War II but remains one in which significant inequalities structure the opportunities of young people today.

# Thursday 22nd November 2018, 5.00pm - Professor Harriet Bulkeley, Department of Geography, Durham University
Climate Changed Urban Futures: imaginaries, experiments & justice in the Anthropocene city
Venue: Large Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography, Downing Site

Abstract not available

# Thursday 7th February 2019, 5.00pm - Professor Derek Gregory, Department of Geography, University of British Columbia
Bloody Geography: injured bodies and the spaces of modern war
Venue: Large Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography, Downing Site

Abstract not available

# Thursday 7th March 2019, 5.00pm - Professor Stuart Lane, Faculté des géosciences et de l'environnement, Université de Lausanne
Stratigraphical discourse in the Anthropocene: towards a more critical geographical tradition
Venue: Large Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography, Downing Site

Abstract not available

ERC Research Presentations, Department of Geography

Description to be confirmed

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Wednesday 28th November 2018, 1.00pm - Professor Matthew Gandy, Department of Geography, Cambridge University
Rethinking Urban Nature
Venue: Small Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography, Downing Site

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 20th February 2019, 1.00pm - Dr Richard Powell, Department of Geography, Cambridge University
ARCTIC CULT
Venue: Small Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography, Downing Site

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 27th February 2019, 1.00pm - Dr Maan Barua, Department of Geography, Cambridge University
Urban ecologies: governing nonhuman life in global cities
Venue: Small Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography, Downing Site

Abstract not available

Other talks

Talks in the Department of Geography not connected to any other seminar series.

There are no forthcoming seminars at present. Please check back here later.

You may wish to view the archive of previous seminars.