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Department of Geography

 

Research seminars

Research seminars

Jump to: Main Departmental seminars | Cultural and Historical Geography | Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure | Conservation | Environmental Systems and Processes | Political ecology | Polar physical science | Histories, cultures, environments and politics research seminars | Polar Humanities and Social Sciences ECR Workshop | Gender | Black in Geography student led talks | Quaternary Discussion Group (QDG) | Cambridge Volcanology | Cambridge Cultural and Historical Geography | Geographies of Knowledge | Infrastructural Geographies | Biogeography and Biogeomorphology | Graduate Workshops in Economic and Social History | Centenary Lecture Series | ERC Research Presentations | Arctic Environmental Humanities Workshop Series | Other talks | Reading groups

Directions to the Department are available.

Main Departmental seminar series

Main Departmental seminar series at the Department of Geography.

There are no forthcoming seminars at present. Please check back here later.

You may wish to view the archive of previous seminars.

Seminars in Cultural and Historical Geography

All seminars begin at 1pm and take place in the Hardy Building, Room 101 (unless otherwise stated), Department of Geography. All welcome!

There are no forthcoming seminars at present. Please check back here later.

You may wish to view the archive of previous seminars.

The Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure - seminar series

Research seminar series run by the Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure.

Seminars will take place on Zoom.

The support of the Trevelyan Fund (Faculty of History) is gratefully acknowledged.

Convenors: Romola Davenport (rjd23@cam.ac.uk), Alice Reid (alice.reid@geog.cam.ac.uk) and Leigh Shaw-Taylor (lmws2@cam.ac.uk).

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Wednesday 10th March 2021, 10.00am - Zhongwei Zhao (School of Demography, Australian National University)
Note unusual time
Major macro-socioeconomic driving forces of China’s mortality decline in recent decades
Venue: Zoom webinar - link to follow

Abstract not available

Cambridge Conservation Seminars

The series is intended to provide a research and social focus for university lecturers, research staff and postgraduate students interested in conservation research. The primary aim is to inform university colleagues of what research is going on in different departments and to bring in high quality outside speakers. Equally, members of conservation organisations are welcome to attend. A key element is the opportunity after each talk to socialise with colleagues from different departments and organisations.

Generously funded by the CCI Strategic Initiative Fund
http://www.conservation.cam.ac.uk/

There are no forthcoming seminars at present. Please check back here later.

You may wish to view the archive of previous seminars.

Climate and Environmental Dynamics - Department of Geography

Seminars which may be of interest to members of the Climate and Environmental Dynamics research group within the Department of Geography.

There are no forthcoming seminars at present. Please check back here later.

You may wish to view the archive of previous seminars.

Polar Physical Sciences

Histories, cultures, environments and politics research seminars

Black in Geography student led talks

These student led discussions seek to disrupt the Whiteness of the discipline of Geography. By doing so, we hope to create Black spaces for Black geographers (students and lecturers alike) to be able to share their experiences and thoughts on urgent issues.

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Friday 12th March 2021, 1.00pm - Dr. Pat Noxolo University of Birmingham
Black in Geography Pat Noxolo Talk - 12th March 1-2pm
Venue: Zoom

These student led discussions seek to disrupt the Whiteness of the discipline of Geography. By doing so, we hope to create spaces for Black geographers (students and lecturers alike) to be able to share their experiences and thoughts on urgent issues.

On our first panel, Dr. Pat Noxolo (Senior lecturer, University of Birmingham) and two students will be sharing their thoughts on the question: “What can academic geography learn from Black geographies and Black organising? And how can we avoid co-optation?”. All are welcome! This talk is informal, will not be recorded and those attending can bring their lunch too if they wish.

Please fill out your email address on this Google form to be able to receive the Zoom link on the morning of the event: http://shorturl.at/tzCNV .

About Dr. Pat Noxolo: Dr. Noxolo is a Senior Lecturer in Human Geography at the School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of Birmingham. She is also lead researcher on the Leverhulme-funded Caribbean In/securities and Creativity (CARISCC) research network, co-editor of Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, and secretary of the RACE group of the Royal Geographical Society. As one of the most significant voices in debates on postcoloniality within contemporary Geography, Pat’s scholarship spans international development, cultural geography, and studies of security and insecurity. She has written extensively on race, postcolonial theory, and cultural practices including dance and literature. In addition, Pat recently became an AHRC EDI fellow, and is developing a project called Creative Approaches to Race in the Caribbean and the UK (CARICUK) which includes a series of artistic provocations exploring racism as a form of in/security.

We look forward to seeing you there!

Quaternary Discussion Group (QDG)

A series of 50 minute lectures, followed by discussion, on the broad topic of environmental evolution, climate, ecological and human change during the Quaternary (the last ~2.6 million years). The lectures are aimed at a broad audience (including geoscientists, glaciologists, environmental scientists, atmospheric chemists, biologists, anthropologists and archaeologists).

Seminars are on Thursdays starting at 17:30. Wine is served after the talks and there is time for discussion over drinks and/or dinner.

QDG is currently organised by David Hodell, Christine Lane, Francesco Muschitiello, Eric Wolff. Please feel free to contact us with queries and suggestions.

To sign up to the QDG mailing list, follow this link:
https://lists.cam.ac.uk/mailman/listinfo/soc-qdg-quaternary-disc-reminder

There are no forthcoming seminars at present. Please check back here later.

You may wish to view the archive of previous seminars.

Cambridge Volcanology

Cambridge Volcanology seminars.

There are no forthcoming seminars at present. Please check back here later.

You may wish to view the archive of previous seminars.

Cambridge Cultural and Historical Geography (CCHG) - Department of Geography

Seminars and public lectures within the Cambridge Cultural and Historical Geography research group of the Department of Geography.

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Wednesday 10th March 2021, 10.00am - Zhongwei Zhao (School of Demography, Australian National University)
Note unusual time
Major macro-socioeconomic driving forces of China’s mortality decline in recent decades
Venue: Zoom webinar - link to follow

Abstract not available

Geographies of Knowledge - Department of Geography

Seminars and public lectures within the Geographies of Knowledge research group of the Department of Geography.

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Tuesday 9th March 2021, 4.00pm - Samantha Saville (University of Cambridge)
Change, continuity and value in Svalbard
Venue: Zoom

Abstract not available

# Thursday 11th March 2021, 2.00pm - Marc Jacobsen (SPRI)
Greenland Geopolitics in the light of renewed American attention
Venue: Zoom

Abstract not available

# Tuesday 11th May 2021, 4.00pm - Olga Ulturgasheva (University of Manchester) and Barbara Bodenhorn (University of Cambridge)
Languages of Emergency, Infrastructures of Response and Everyday Heroism in the Circumpolar North
Venue: Zoom

Abstract not available

Biogeography and Biogeomorphology - Department of Geography

Seminars and public lectures within the Biogeography and Biogeomorphology research group of the Department of Geography.

There are no forthcoming seminars at present. Please check back here later.

You may wish to view the archive of previous seminars.

Infrastructural Geographies - Department of Geography

Seminars and public lectures within the Infrastructural Geographies research group of the Department of Geography.

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Thursday 11th March 2021, 5.00pm - Dr Franco Barchiesi
Lethal Necessities: Precarity, Citizenship, and the Paradigm of Racial Violence (Subaltern & Decolonial Citizenships series)
Venue: Online (Zoom)

In the wake of the past decade of global capitalist meltdown, amplified by the current pandemic, corporate and state management of crisis has revealed the precarity of lives forced to depend on waged jobs that, in the context of COVID-19, have been wiped out by the tens of millions, belying the normative values attached to employment status and policy fixations with “job creation”. Precarity verges indeed on the actual lethality of jobs deemed “essential”, whose allocation reflects long-standing patterns of racial domination. While stimulated by the ethical collapse of job-centered social imagination, which COVID-19 dramatically underscores, this presentation is not primarily focused on the eventfulness of specific crises as highlighting the precarity of employment, or even on growing scholarly perceptions of how precarity announces the twilight of neoliberalism. Instead, to write about the lethal entanglements of work and precarity in times like this demands attention to long-duration paradigms that structure contingency and event, revealing the permanence of violence in excess of the framework of political economy. My core argument is that the nexus of work, death, and mass disposability rests on the ways in which racial domination and colonial dispossession have informed the conjunction of work and citizenship in the transition from post-slavery emancipation to the globalization of the racial as a principle for the hierarchical ordering of difference between the nineteenth and the twentieth centuries. Within that global context—which critical Black perspectives have increasingly referred to as “the afterlife of slavery”—the notion of citizenship came to revolve around work and economic activity according to modalities that critical theory has analyzed as hegemonic, disciplinary, or biopolitical. None of these modalities, however, address the ways in which employment has been assumed to be the horizon and structural limitation of Black emancipation as geared not to citizenship but to renewed captivity and social death. Positioning the constitutive precarity of capitalist employment within reconfigured structures of post-slavery anti-Black violence offers therefore stronger analytical insights into the non-contingent lethality of commodity-producing work as well as its persistent racialization.

Fieldwork Seminar: Methodologies in the 'field'

These seminars at the Department of Geography are based on reflections from recently undertaken (though this is not essential) fieldwork, and will engage with the challenges of fieldwork, and the contradictions between methodology as we understand it in abstraction, and what plays out in the field.

There are no forthcoming seminars at present. Please check back here later.

You may wish to view the archive of previous seminars.

Graduate Workshop in Economic and Social History

The Workshop meets alternate Mondays on Zoom, 12.30pm.

Convened by Caitlin Adams (cia26) and Tom Tyson (tmt27).

To join the mailing list, please complete the Google Form:
https://forms.gle/RcAx1t4WWY1yL2RA9

Twitter: @EconomicandSoc2

There are no forthcoming seminars at present. Please check back here later.

You may wish to view the archive of previous seminars.

Centenary Lecture Series, Department of Geography

Description to be confirmed

There are no forthcoming seminars at present. Please check back here later.

You may wish to view the archive of previous seminars.

ERC Research Presentations, Department of Geography

Description to be confirmed

There are no forthcoming seminars at present. Please check back here later.

You may wish to view the archive of previous seminars.

Arctic Environmental Humanities Workshop Series

The Scott Polar Research Institute at the University of Cambridge and the Frederick S. Pardee School of Global Studies at Boston University are pleased to host the Arctic Environmental Humanities Workshop Series.

As the Arctic gains greater visibility among academics and diverse publics, we see an urgent need for humanities scholars to help shape the current debates and research priorities too often limited to the natural and social sciences. This rise in awareness of Arctic issues coincides with widespread academic initiatives in the emerging interdisciplinary field of environmental humanities. These growing interests in the Arctic and in the environmental humanities are in turn both catalyzed by the climate crisis; the urgency of this crisis is central to, but not exhaustive of, our collective commitment to Arctic environmental humanities (AEH).

We envision this workshop series as a collaborative enterprise that is robustly interdisciplinary and brings together diverse expertise of humanistic scholars, artists, and researchers drawn from international circles. Presentations and conversations will take place in varied formats, all online and freely accessible to all those interested. The perspectives and participation of northern communities and people will be particularly valuable and encouraged.

There are no forthcoming seminars at present. Please check back here later.

You may wish to view the archive of previous seminars.

Other talks

Talks in the Department of Geography not connected to any other seminar series.

There are no forthcoming seminars at present. Please check back here later.

You may wish to view the archive of previous seminars.