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Department of Geography

 

Decent Work and Youth Livelihoods Programme

Decent Work and Youth Livelihoods Programme

People

Alice Amegah

Alice Amegah

PhD Candidate, Department of Education, University of Cambridge.

Alice Amegah is an emerging expert in Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) for development. She is a PhD in Education candidate at the University of Cambridge, where she researches young women's participation in STEM in vocational pathways in Ghana. She is the brains behind Education and Aspirations Hub, a non-profit organisation providing quality and equitable guidance and counselling to prepare young people for education and work transitions. Education and Aspirations Hub is based on her experience in adolescent counselling, teaching and research. As the current President of the African Society of Cambridge University, Alice is creating systems where African students, as one of the minorities groups at the University of Cambridge, can thrive as a group of young African leaders.

Dr Anna Barford

Dr Anna Barford

Senior Research Associate at the Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership, and Bye Fellow in Geography at Murray Edwards College

Anna's research centres upon the intersection of the economy, society, policy and the environment. There are currently two major themes within Anna's work. One focus is the contemporary disruptions to youth livelihoods in lower income countries and how young people are responding to these. Within this theme, one project investigates climate change in Uganda, another looks at the COVID19 impacts in Nepal and Indonesia. Anna's other work looks at business pathways to improving work, focusing on work in the circular economy and the business case living wages. Anna supervises ESRC PhD students Kate Brockie and Grace Mueller on issues of youth employment in Bangladesh and Nepal, respectively.

Dr. Debangana Bose

Dr. Debangana Bose

Research Associate at the Department of Geography at the University of Cambridge

Debangana is interested in the future of work, internal labour migration, and the everyday politics of labour and placemaking in the Global South, particularly in India.

Her research at the University of Cambridge focuses on two broad dimensions of the future of work and the everyday politics of labour in small towns in India. First, Debangana examines the differential access to and working conditions of gig/platform workers in the transport/mobility sector, food delivery sectors, and freelance cloud work in small towns in India. With a spatial and intersectional focus, this research asks how small-town ethics of work and local power relations reshape not only the penetration of platforms and platform-mediated work but also the platform aggregator-worker relations and the very constitution and meanings of platforms.

Additionally, she examines how bottom-up entrepreneurialism enabled through e-commerce platforms has flourished and reshaped urban spaces and lives following job losses during the COVID-19 pandemic in small towns in India and what such entrepreneurialism entail beyond neoliberal subject formation among the youth in terms of their identity and belonging in small cities characterized by high out-migration.

Kate Brockie

Kate Brockie

Postgraduate student in the Department of Geography, funded by an ESRC Doctoral Training Programme Knowledge Exchange Scheme studentship partnered with the International Labour Organisation, and member of Pembroke College

Kate is researching decent work opportunities for the world's growing youth population. In collaboration with the International Labour Organization, Kate's research is concerned with the characteristics, expectations and aspirations for work amongst marginalised young people in low- and middle-income countries. Her doctoral research will combine detailed data analysis of relevant global surveys with qualitative research focused on the lived experiences and perspectives of female NEET (not in employment, education or training) youth in Bangladesh.

Dr Brendan Burchell

Dr Brendan Burchell

Reader in the Social Sciences, Director of Graduate Education in Department of Sociology, and Director of the Cambridge Undergraduate Quantitative Methods Centre

Brendan's research interests focus upon the effects of labour market experiences (e.g. job insecurity, work intensification, bankruptcy, zero hours contracts, part-time work, unemployment) on psychological well-being. He is also interested in the social psychological effects of precarious employment and unemployment, gender segregation, men's and women's life cycle and career, and emotional reactions to personal finances: "Financial Phobia".

Dr Katarzyna Cieslik

Dr Katarzyna Cieslik

Philomathia Fellow and Research Associate in the Department of Geography, and Bye Fellow of Murray Edwards College

Katarzyna is a scholar in Development Studies whose research focuses on the interactions among society, policy and environment, and their implications for sustainable development in the Global South. She is particularly interested in the agency, entrepreneurship and civic potency of individuals in addressing the pressing development challenges related to sustainable livelihoods. Her work at Cambridge focuses on youth and livelihoods in Sub-Saharan Africa, with a particular focus on public policy for employment creation and environment/employment trade-offs.

Dr Adam Coutts

Dr Adam Coutts

Research Associate in the Department of Sociology, Senior Research Fellow at Magdalene College, and Affiliated Researcher at the Bennett Institute for Public Policy

Adam's current research (supported by the Health Foundation, 2017-2020) is a Randomised Control Trial evaluation to test how an Active Labour Market Programme (ALMP) called Group Work / JOBS II can be used to protect the mental health and wellbeing of the unemployed as well as return people to work.

Phoenix Kenney

Phoenix Kenney

PhD student, Faculty of Education and Murray Edwards College

Phoenix's doctoral research looks at the reality of turning civic participation into employment for young people in Nepal. In particular, she is interested in transferrable and soft skills education, youth-led organisation and youth-inclusive policy development. This project builds on her master's research that used social media analysis to understand the different ways young people mobilised in community and national reconstruction after the 2015 earthquakes around Kathmandu Valley.

Grace Mueller

Grace Mueller

Postgraduate student in the Department of Geography, funded by an ESRC Doctoral Training Programme Knowledge Exchange Scheme studentship partnered with the International Youth NGO Restless Development, and member of Queens' College

Grace is interested in inclusive qualitative methodologies and how work can be an avenue for social and political mobility, in addition to economic welfare, among marginalized communities in South Asia. Her research focuses on young mothers' experiences of work in Nepal. Grace's previous research is focused on how COVID-19 has impacted the livelihoods of young people in Indonesia and Nepal, with attention toward more vulnerable and hard-to-reach groups (supported by the Asian Development Bank, led by Restless Development, and in collaboration with Dr. Anna Barford). Grace's Masters research studied the use of entrepreneurship within the Hindu Dalit community in NE Bangladesh.

Charis Idicheria Nogossek

Charis Idicheria Nogossek

PhD student, Department of Sociology

Charis' doctoral research explores women's work and employment transitions in India, specifically in peri-urban areas. Her previous research and consulting projects have been on urban livelihoods, participatory urban planning, gender and social protection.

Iyeyinka Omigbodun

Iyeyinka Omigbodun

PhD student, Department of Sociology

Iyeyinka is passionate about the socio-economic advancement of Africa and the eradication of poverty. Her research focuses on youth employment in West Africa. She is particularly interested in studying apprenticeship schemes and start-up incubators as pathways into youth self-employment and their implications on working conditions, mental well-being and innovation. She has also conducted research on good governance and the Nigerian bureaucracy.

Professor Pauline Rose

Professor Pauline Rose

Professor of International Education, Director of the Research for Equitable Access and Learning (REAL) Centre, and Senior Research Fellow at the UK Department for International Development

Pauline's work examines educational policy and practice, including in relation to inequality, financing and governance, democratization, and the role of international aid. She has worked on large collaborative research programmes with teams in sub‐Saharan Africa and South Asia examining these issues. Throughout her career, she has worked closely with international aid donors and non-governmental organisations, providing evidence-based policy advice on a wide range of issues aimed at fulfilling commitments to education for all.

Garima Sahai

Dr Garima Sahai

Research Associate, Department of Geography, and Bye Fellow, Murray Edwards College

Garima's research interests centre on issues of youth, gender, and work in the Global South. She is especially interested in interdisciplinary approaches, and the intersections between research, policy, and international development practice.

Garima's PhD at Cambridge examined young women's entry into non-traditionally female job training in India. The research provided insights into factors that shape poor young women's working lives and drew out implications for policy that aims to expand the occupational opportunity set for young women.

Before coming to Cambridge, Garima worked at the World Bank and Oxford Poverty Human Development Initiative.

Dame Barbara Stocking

Dame Barbara Stocking

President Emerita of Murray Edwards College

Dame Barbara Stocking became the 5th President of Murray Edwards College, founded as New Hall, in July 2013, and served in this role until September 2021. In addition to Barbara's College responsibilities, Barbara was a Trustee of the Gates Cambridge Trust and the Cambridge Trusts, and Chair of the Faculty Board of Human, Social and Political Sciences. She is currently Chair of a Panel for a Global Public Health Convention, and is also Chair of the Trustees of Blueprint for Better Business, and Chair of the Steering Committee for the Humanitarian Memorial.

Prior to taking up the post of President at Murray Edwards College, Barbara was Chief Executive of Oxfam from May 2001 until February 2013. During this time she led major humanitarian responses. On campaigning, Barbara led Oxfam's work on Make Poverty History, and more recently their work on climate change and the current Grow campaign on food justice in a resource constrained world. Barbara regularly spoke at major global meetings, eg. Davos, World Economic Forum, UN, etc.

Prof Bhaskar Vira

Prof Bhaskar Vira

Professor of Political Economy, Fellow of Fitzwilliam College, and Founding Director of the University of Cambridge Conservation Research Institute

Bhaskar's research interests centre on the changing political economy of environment and development, especially in South Asia; with a particular interest in the political ecology of forests, water, food, wildlife and landuse change and the social and political context for biodiversity conservation.