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Department of Geography

 

Seminars

Seminars

Political Ecology Group meetings
Meetings of the Political Ecology Group.
Magic Circle seminar group
The Magic Circle seminar group is a long-running group for the informal discussion of research in progress on ritual, symbolism and the anthropology of religion worldwide, and its interface with theology, psychology and related disciplines. Participants and speakers include graduate students, senior scholars, and practitioners of religion and psychology.
Circumpolar History and Public Policy Research Seminars
These are seminars for the Circumpolar History and Public Policy group at the Scott Polar Research Institute.

Forthcoming seminars

Seminars within the Natures, Cultures, Knowledges research group of the Department of Geography.

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Tuesday 28th January 2020, 1.00pm - Isabella M. Radhuber, University of Vienna (Austria)
Gender and Extractivism in Plurinational States – An intersectional approach to mining in Bolivia and Ecuador
Venue: Hardy Building 101 (first floor), Downing Site, Cambridge

Co-authored with Marie Jasser

Highly diverse societies in the Andes clearly display the disproportionate impact of mining activities on women. Two cases – Bolivia’s biggest tin mine (Posokoni Mountain) in the Andean mountain plateau municipality Huanuni and Ecuador’s emerging copper exploitation in the megadiverse cloud forest region of Intag – show that specific impacts on women reinforce existing inequalities along poverty, ethnicity and rural-urban divisions. In this paper, we connect modern/colonial insights and recent contributions on extractivism within the broader field of feminist political ecology. We trace how gender-sensitive power relations in both places ultimately render the co-existence of variegated forms of living and production impossible. We find that a ‘legal shielding of mining companies’ leads to the suspension of democratic and fundamental rights of populations in affected territories. The consequences of ‘dispossession by contamination’ prove to be particular severe for indigenous-peasant-popular women as these consequences thwart subsistence activities that (in combination with housework activities) are carried out mainly by women. The fact that reproduction in these territories has been rendered impossible is being contested by increasingly female-led activism. This comparative case study sheds light on the gendered and variegated dynamics of extractivism in socio-environmental settings of high diversity.

# Tuesday 28th January 2020, 4.30pm - Morgan Seag (University of Cambridge)
Gender and 20th century Antarctic fieldwork: Constructing and dismantling the 'ice ceiling'
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Lecture Theatre

Abstract not available

# Tuesday 4th February 2020, 1.00pm - Juan Martin Dabezies, Universidad de la República (Uruguay)
Invasive species and ecological imperialism in South America. Current interactions between wood industry, wild boars, perroquets and hunters in Uruguay
Venue: Hardy Building 101 (first floor), Downing Site, Cambridge

Uruguay is a cattle country. The colonization of Uruguay (and much of the Southern Cone of America) was based on the production and export of leather and meat of exotic species deliberately introduced by humans: cows. Livestock is currently the main productive activity of Uruguay. However, for about 30 years new species introduced by humans such as eucalyptus and soybeans, are changing the national productive map, competing with livestock as the country’s main productive activities. At the same time that the area of expansion of these new species begins to increase, wild boars and perroquets were declared national pests. Recently the wild boar is being fought very strongly because in addition to being a productive threat, it is an exotic environmental threat. In this presentation I analyze the postcolonial processes that have generated new ecological assemblages between exotic and native species, leading to some being considered plague and others almost “sacred.” Specifically I focus on fighting wild boar and the discursive roots based on speeches around production, conservation and biosecurity.

# Tuesday 11th February 2020, 4.30pm - Sofia Gavrilova (University of Oxford)
Constructing the Other: representations of Arctic native communities in Russian regional museums
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Lecture Theatre

Abstract not available

# Tuesday 25th February 2020, 1.00pm - Gediminas Lesutis, University of Cambridge
The infrastructural other: spatial effects of the Standard Gauge Railway in Kenya
Venue: Hardy Building 101 (first floor), Downing Site, Cambridge

TBA

# Tuesday 3rd March 2020, 1.00pm - Trishant Simlai, University of Cambridge
Negotiating the panoptic gaze: people, power and conservation surveillance in the Corbett tiger reserve, India
Venue: Hardy Building 101 (first floor), Downing Site, Cambridge

TBA

# Tuesday 3rd March 2020, 4.30pm - Max Jones (University of Manchester)
Fridtjof Nansen’s FRAM expedition and the Making of a Transnational Hero
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Lecture Theatre

Abstract not available

# Tuesday 12th May 2020, 4.30pm - Olga Ulturgasheva (University of Manchester) and Barbara Bodenhorn (University of Cambridge)
Envisioning Arctic Futures: Digital and Otherwise
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Lecture Theatre

Abstract not available