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Department of Geography

 

Seminars

Seminars

Political Ecology Group meetings
Meetings of the Political Ecology Group.
Magic Circle seminar group
The Magic Circle seminar group is a long-running group for the informal discussion of research in progress on ritual, symbolism and the anthropology of religion worldwide, and its interface with theology, psychology and related disciplines. Participants and speakers include graduate students, senior scholars, and practitioners of religion and psychology.
Circumpolar History and Public Policy Research Seminars
These are seminars for the Circumpolar History and Public Policy group at the Scott Polar Research Institute.

Forthcoming seminars

Seminars within the Natures, Cultures, Knowledges research group of the Department of Geography.

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Tuesday 28th May 2019, 1.00pm - Suresh Babu Ambedkar University Delhi
Nature in the City: thinking 'post' ecologies in Delhi
Venue: Hardy Building 101 (first floor), Downing Site, Cambridge

Abstract not available

# Tuesday 4th June 2019, 1.00pm - Judith Plummer Braeckman - Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership
‘To dam or not to dam?’ Issues in financing and developing large hydropower.
Venue: Hardy Building 101 (first floor), Downing Site, Cambridge

Abstract not available

# Tuesday 11th June 2019, 1.00pm - Victoria Maguire-Rajpaul University of Oxford
The continued marginalisation of cocoa farmers: from colonialism to contemporary, climate-smart governance
Venue: Hardy Building 101 (first floor), Downing Site, Cambridge

Abstract not available

# Tuesday 18th June 2019, 1.00pm - Alice Vadrot University of Vienna
The Politics of Marine Biodiversity Data: Global and National Policies and Practices of Monitoring the Oceans
Venue: Hardy Building 101 (first floor), Downing Site, Cambridge

In order to protect marine biodiversity and ensure that benefits are equally shared, the UN General Assembly has decided to develop a new legally binding treaty under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS). Marine biodiversity data will play a central role: Firstly, in supporting intergovernmental efforts to identify, protect and monitor marine biodiversity. Secondly, in informing governments interested in particular aspects of marine biodiversity, including its economic use and its contribution to biosecurity.In examining how this data are represented and used, we will create a novel understanding of the materiality of science-policy interrelations and identify new forms of power in global environmental politics as well as develop the methodologies to do so.
This is crucial, because the capacities to develop and use data infrastructures are unequally distributed among countries and global initiatives for data sharing are significantly challenged by conflicting perceptions of who benefits from marine biodiversity research. Despite broad recognition of these challenges within natural science communities the political aspects of marine biodiversity data remain understudied. Academic debates tend to neglect the role of international politics in legitimising and authorising scientific concepts, data sources and criteria and how this influences national monitoring priorities.
The aim of this presentation is to introduce MARIPOLDATA, an ERC funded project, which aims to overcome these shortcomings by developing and applying a new multiscale methodology for grounding the analysis of science-policy interrelations in empirical research. The project collects and analyses data across different policy-levels and spatial scales by combining 1) ethnographic studies at intergovernmental negotiation sites with 2) a comparative analysis of national biodiversity monitoring policies and practices and 3) bibliometric and social network analyses and oral history interviews for mapping marine biodiversity science.