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NCK

Research projects

Research projects currently being undertaken on this theme include:

Applying social science to making ecosystem service assessments accessible for greater policy impact

Applying social science to making ecosystem service assessments accessible for greater policy impact

Managing our future environment sustainably requires us to understand the link between nature and human well-being. This underpins the ecosystem services (ES) concept – the value of nature through the benefits it provides to people. As part of a consortium of experts from the University and NGOs, the Cambridge Coastal Research Unit (CCRU) has helped develop a 'Toolkit for Ecosystem Service Site-based Assessments' (TESSA): guidance and practical methods for assessing ES values at the site-scale to inform decision-making.

Negotiating pathways to adulthood: social change and indigenous culture in four Arctic communities

Negotiating pathways to adulthood: social change and indigenous culture in four Arctic communities

This project, funded by the US National Science Foundation, examines shared and divergent stressors and resilience strategies among young people from communities among the Alaskan Inupiat, Alaskan Yup’ik, Canadian Inuit, Norwegian Sami and Siberian Eveny.

Developing Indigenous research methodologies in the arctic (IRM-A): examining the impacts of settlement on socialization and youth experience in Siberia and Alaska

Developing Indigenous research methodologies in the arctic (IRM-A): examining the impacts of settlement on socialization and youth experience in Siberia and Alaska

This international, collaborative, comparative ethnographic inquiry aims to explore the ways indigenous research methodologies can be effectively utilized in the study of youth with special focus on local impacts of settlement on socialization practices and experiences of growing up in two arctic Indigenous communities: one in Siberia and one in Alaska.

Cultural constructions of nature

Cultural constructions of nature

This area of research is concerned with the recent move from the purely scientific inputs to environmental management to an understanding of the deeper psychological motivations that are involved in terms of attitudes and values in environmental management (‘psychobiogeography’).

Earlier projects