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Geographies of Knowledge seminars: archive

Geographies of Knowledge seminars: archive

Return to the list of forthcoming seminars.

# Tuesday 14th September 2021, 11.30am - Professor Andrew Stuhl, Bucknell University
What Can We Learn from Ignorance? Arctic Energy Frontiers, Environmental Regimes, and Indigenous Rights Movements Since the 1970s
Venue: Co-hosted with Pardee Center, Boston University

Doug Pimlott was shocked. The University of Toronto zoologist — one of Canada’s leading environmentalists — had just discovered a government secret. In 1973, the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs was planning an oil drilling program in the ice-choked Beaufort Sea (Arctic Ocean). What stunned Pimlott was not that the Department would target such a remote and challenging place for oil exploration. After all, the energy situation in North America in 1973 had grown desperate. Rather, it was that the entire discussion of the risks involved — to the delicate marine environment and to thousands of Inuit who relied upon its bounty — had been shielded from public scrutiny. “Nearly all the substantive information on offshore drilling plans is contained in various confidential proposals put forward by the oil industry and in restricted reports by the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs,” the scientist wrote. “Why had native communities in the region not been consulted about offshore drilling plans? Why was this new phase of exploration cloaked in secrecy?” As Pimlott searched for answers, Canada’s Cabinet pressed forward. In 1976, they approved two wells for the Beaufort Sea’s outer continental shelf. A year later, they supported long-term drilling there. The world’s northernmost oil frontier had been opened.
In this talk, Prof. Andrew Stuhl will examine the state of knowledge that Pimlott experienced as a constitutive element of energy frontiers, environmental regimes, and struggles for Indigenous rights in the late twentieth-century Arctic. That is, while actors in the oil industry and the Canadian government produced detailed studies about the risks and rewards of drilling in the Beaufort Sea, their circulation was limited — which also produced deliberate, widespread ignorance. Their efforts to maintain a state of limited knowledge blunted resistance from environmentalists and Indigenous rights advocates whose political power was on the rise. These activists attempted to slow or delay oil development by pointing out that oil companies knew very little about the sensitive ecologies and Indigenous claims to land in the Arctic. In response, oil companies designed elaborate consultation campaigns to nurture local support and undercut opposition to oil exploitation. Drawing on recently declassified sources from the Canadian federal government and the oil and gas industry, Prof. Stuhl will explore how studies of ignorance can thus help explain the shape of public interest groups, corporate social responsibility campaigns, oil and gas schemes, research agendas in the natural sciences, and environmental politics in Arctic North America over the last 50 years.

# Thursday 24th June 2021, 2.00pm - Nina Döring (IASS) and Elle Merete Omma (Saami Council)
Improving the relationships between researchers and Indigenous rights holders in the Arctic - What needs to change in funding?
Venue: Zoom

Abstract not available

# Thursday 3rd June 2021, 2.00pm - Mia Surridge & Alex Partridge (The Polar Museum, Cambridge)
Contentious Collections? Decolonising the Polar Museum
Venue: Zoom

Abstract not available

# Thursday 27th May 2021, 3.00pm - Marisa Karyl Franz (New York University)
Mariinsky Post as a Meeting Place: Affective Encounters and Ethnographic Records
Venue: Zoom

Abstract not available

# Tuesday 11th May 2021, 4.00pm - Olga Ulturgasheva (University of Manchester) and Barbara Bodenhorn (University of Cambridge)
Cancelled
[Cancelled] Languages of Emergency, Infrastructures of Response and Everyday Heroism in the Circumpolar North
Venue: Zoom

Abstract not available

# Thursday 6th May 2021, 2.00pm - Sophie Duveau (Centre Alexandre Koyré, Paris)
Science in Practice: Sharing the field with natural scientists
Venue: Zoom

Abstract not available

# Thursday 11th March 2021, 2.00pm - Marc Jacobsen (SPRI)
Greenland Geopolitics in the light of renewed American attention
Venue: Zoom

Abstract not available

# Tuesday 9th March 2021, 4.00pm - Samantha Saville (University of Cambridge)
Change, continuity and value in Svalbard
Venue: Zoom

Abstract not available

# Thursday 25th February 2021, 2.00pm - Laura Seddon (University of Durham)
The challenges and opportunities of working across the physical and social sciences
Venue: Zoom

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 24th February 2021, 1.00pm - Sam Saville (Unviersity of Cambridge)
Towards Humble Geographies
Venue: Zoom: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/87664367578?pwd=c0hwRmFXbDFEQWlXMW9kaWRFa3EwQT09

Abstract not available

# Thursday 11th February 2021, 2.00pm - Daniela Portella Sampaio (City, University of London)
Fishing and conservation in the Southern Ocean: methodological challenges with stakeholders’ interviews
Venue: Zoom

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 10th February 2021, 1.00pm - Julia Schubert (University of Bonn)
Science-Politics Alliances and the Career of Climate Engineering: Making Sense of a ‘Bad Idea Whose Time has Come’
Venue: Zoom: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89064485170?pwd=VERUMndwSHdPTWpXZHBTd0NiS29pUT09

Abstract not available

# Tuesday 9th February 2021, 4.00pm - Duncan Depledge (Loughborough University)
[POSTPONED] Defence and Security in the Arctic: The UK perspective
Venue: Zoom

Abstract not available

# Thursday 28th January 2021, 2.00pm - Eva Crowson and Elise Nyborg (University of Cambridge, SPRI)
Rethinking the Virtual: Towards Digital Decolonisation in the Scott Polar Research Institute
Venue: Zoom

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 27th January 2021, 1.00pm - Efram Sera-Shriar, Alex Rose, and Rupert Cole (Science Museum, London)
Curating Environmental Change at the Science Museum
Venue: Zoom: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86705370977?pwd=ak1XblJvRFFWVllSYU1wUFc3bG91QT09

Abstract not available

# Tuesday 26th January 2021, 4.00pm - Henry Anderson-Elliott (University of Cambridge)
Captive polar bears: politics, (re)production, and performance
Venue: Zoom

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 16th December 2020, 4.00pm - Inuk Silis Høegh, Independent filmmaker
Sumé: the Sound of a Revolution (film pre-screening and discussion)
Venue: Co-hosted with Pardee Center, Boston University

The film tells the remarkable story of Greenland’s first rock band and its huge impact on the new awakening of Greenlandic people in the 1970s. Høegh’s talk will focus on the film in light of recent developments in Greenland, from increasing steps towards independence, Trump’s desire to “purchase” Greenland, and relations with other international powers like China.

Sumé can be viewed on Vimeo by following this link:
https://vimeo.com/110360218/f46f00b285

# Thursday 3rd December 2020, 2.00pm - Iqra Choudhury (University of Manchester)
SCAR in the 60s: The successes and failures of science diplomacy in Antarctica
Venue: Zoom

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 2nd December 2020, 1.00pm - Marijn Nieuwenhuis (Durham University)
An auto-ethnographic account of a hitchhiking journey from Gateshead to Poland
Venue: Online

Abstract not available

# Tuesday 1st December 2020, 4.00pm - Max Jones (University of Manchester)
Exploration, Celebrity and the Making of a Transnational Hero: Fridtjof Nansen and the Fram Expedition
Venue: Zoom

Abstract not available

# Thursday 26th November 2020, 2.00pm - Jean de Pomereu (Associate of SPRI)
Beyond Sublime: Antarctic art since WWII
Venue: Zoom

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 18th November 2020, 1.00pm - Tom Simpson (Cambridge University)
The climatic pivot: Mapping water, people, and empires in Central Asia, c.1850-1930
Venue: Online

Abstract not available

# Thursday 12th November 2020, 4.00pm - Charlotte Schoonman (AWI), Anna Guasco (University of Cambridge), Karla Boxall (SPRI)
Roundtable discussion: Conducting Research in a Pandemic
Venue: Zoom

This will be a roundable discussion on the subject of conducting research during a pandemic. We will hear from a panel consisting of people at different stages in their academic careers.

# Wednesday 4th November 2020, 1.00pm - Johanne M. Bruun (Cambridge University)
Archiving Arctic ecologies in the early twentieth century: the field and its archival prostheses
Venue: Online

Abstract not available

# Tuesday 3rd November 2020, 4.00pm - Michael Bravo (University of Cambridge)
Author Meets Critics: North Pole: Nature and Culture
Venue: Zoom

Conservation with author Michael Bravo about his latest book, ‘North Pole: Nature and Culture’, with Johanne Bruun, Nanna Kaalund, Josh Nall and John Woitkowitz.

# Thursday 29th October 2020, 2.00pm - Eleanor Peers (University of Cambridge)
What’s in a model? Shifting multi-species relationships in Sakha (Yakutia)
Venue: Zoom

Abstract not available

# Thursday 15th October 2020, 2.00pm - Alice Oates (University of Cambridge) and Osnat Katz (University College London)
Finding connections across space, time, and disciplines: Space and Antarctica
Venue: Zoom

Abstract not available

# Tuesday 13th October 2020, 6.00pm - Professor Bathsheba Demuth (Brown University)
Note that the talk is accompanied by a "pre-reading" available to download upon registration.
Arctic Energy Before Petroleum: Or, What Whales Can Tell Us About Writing History
Venue: Co-hosted with Pardee Center, Boston University

Professor Demuth’s talk will draw on her multiple-prize winning first book, Floating Coast: An Environmental History of the Bering Strait (W.W. Norton, 2019). The book was named a Nature Top Ten Book of 2019 and Best Book of 2019 by NPR, Kirkus Reviews, and Library Journal, among others. Further details, advance reading, and registration (free and required) for the seminar are available via the Arctic Environmental Humanities Workshop website below.

# Tuesday 29th September 2020, 4.00pm - Professor Sverker Sörlin, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden
Why we should develop Arctic Humanities
Venue: Co-hosted with Pardee Center, Boston University

In the first two decades of the present century we have seen a growth of what has been called the “integrative humanities”. Looking back at politics of frugality and various symptoms of crisis, humanities scholars and institutions around the world have looked for new agendas. These have varied, but a common feature has often been the idea that relevance and a sense of purpose has increased when different strands of humanities have organized themselves into intellectual and issue oriented alliances around, for example environment, climate, natural resources, rights issues, health, sustainable development. In this respect the Arctic, or the Poles, may be seen as an issue area, rather than as just a region among other regions, or as just the object of a set of disciplinary practices, like any topic.
Arctic knowledge production remains dominated by the sciences while the issues that are looking for answers are by and large societal and cultural, indeed also political. I am in earnest interested in the issue of how the humanities can articulate the desire for a stronger presence in polar research, and despite some progress (mostly limited to certain disciplines) I am confident we have not yet reached as far as we can.

# Tuesday 1st September 2020, 5.00pm - Professor Dolly Jørgensen, Faculty of History University of Stavanger, Norway
The Shaggy Saviour of Northern Norway
Venue: Co-hosted with Pardee Center, Boston University

Abstract not available

# Thursday 11th June 2020, 2.00pm - Eleanor Peers and Frances Marsh (Polar Library, Scott Polar Research Institute)
[online] Polar humanities research in the Covid-19 pandemic: Where does the SPRI library fit in?
Venue: Zoom

Libraries in Cambridge and indeed across the world have been closed since March. This PHaSS session is envisaged as an opportunity for library staff to learn about humanities researchers’ needs and worries about access to resources as closure continues and explain some of the possibilities and restrictions the library is likely to have in the future. We hope to start a discussion about how the library might best help SPRI’s humanities and social science researchers, continuing Johanne Bruun’s recent presentation on research without access to your ‘field’, to recognise the imperative and developing need for library and archive services. The session is also an opportunity to engage with how these questions of access to information and knowledge are relevant to the case of decolonising the library.

# Thursday 4th June 2020, 3.00pm - Alexis Rider, University of Pennsylvania
[online] On Blue Ice: Antarctic Meteorites and Deepening Planetary Time
Venue: Zoom

During the Antarctic field season of 1969, a group of Japanese glaciologists stumbled on a unique find—nine meteorite fragments, frozen and embedded in a patch of ancient blue ice. After geochemical analysis, the find was revealed to be even more surprising: rather than being pieces of one parent body, the meteorites were a collection of different rocks of varying terrestrial ages. Hearing of the Antarctic meteorites at a Conference four years later, geologist William Cassidy immediately suspected an explanation lay within the ice: slowly spreading from the center of the continent, the Antarctic ice sheet was a “stranding surface” that collected, subsumed, and finally revealed meteorites over a vast timeframe. Since then, the Antarctic Search for Meteorites program (ANSMET)—a joint venture between the NSF, the Smithsonian Institution, and NASA—has scoured patches of blue ice for the rare celestial objects, collecting as many as 6000 unique fragments in one field season.

This paper takes up Antarctic meteorites as natural chronometers, and traces how the space rocks gave glaciologists and meteoriticists a unique temporal tool for understanding the shape and flow of the Antarctic ice sheet. While meteoriticists were predominantly interested in the meteorites themselves—particularly after waning enthusiasm for moon landings—glaciologists focused on the ice in which they were encased: the preserved meteorites confirmed that blue ice was some of the oldest frozen matter on the planet, samples of which could be used to reconstruct past climates. This paper proposes that by treating meteorites and ice as relational timekeepers, rendered legible through similar modes of geochemical analysis, geologists and astrophysicists from the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory repositioned blue ice as a scientific tool, one that could connect the deep time of Antarctic ice to the deeper time of the cosmos.

# Thursday 14th May 2020, 2.00pm - Ragnhild Feng Dale (Western Norway Research Institute)
[online] Elusive Resources and Community Expectations: Petroleum Narratives by the Norwegian Barents Sea
Venue: Zoom

The debate over whether oil found in the Barents Sea should materialise in jobs in the northern regions of Norway has been a hot topic in public debates in recent years, as oil prices have fluctuated and the resource itself is present in smaller amounts than first expected. In this talk, I’ll discuss a paper I’m currently writing, and zoom in on how the dynamic between petroleum companies and local communities in the Norwegian North are performed and communicated in the debate about the Johan Castberg field outside Nordkapp. Here, narratives and expectations of what the resource will mean for them are affected not only by politics or economics, but also by the elusiveness of the resource itself.

# Tuesday 12th May 2020, 4.30pm - Olga Ulturgasheva (University of Manchester) and Barbara Bodenhorn (University of Cambridge)
[POSTPONED] Languages of Emergency, Infrastructures of Response and Everyday Heroism in the Circumpolar North
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Lecture Theatre

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 6th May 2020, 4.15pm - Professor Mark Carey, University of Oregon
Offshore oil, unruly icebergs, and the war against unpredictability in the North Atlantic Ocean
Venue: Small Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography

We usually hear about icebergs as majestic scenery or climate change icons — not as enemies that should be bombed, towed, smothered, covered, melted, and tracked under high-tech surveillance in the ocean. But this is the story of icebergs in the North Atlantic. Oil companies have been towing icebergs for 50 years, and the International Ice Patrol spent previous decades literally bombing bergs. Meanwhile, the media has offered narratives and storylines that glorify heroic men armed with the newest technologies,
battling against enemy icebergs. It’s all part of a longstanding quest to physically and discursively control ice in the ocean, which has similarities (and differences) from the classic quest to study, understand, and control unpredictable ‘frontier’ spaces. While offering a new view of icebergs and trying to give the ocean some nuanced spatial and temporal dimensions, this talk on the quest to control icebergs grapples with the blue humanities, STS, marine environmental history, GeoHumanities, and climate justice.

# Tuesday 5th May 2020, 5.00pm - Professor Mark Carey, University of Oregon
Toward climate justice -- Should we rethink our narratives of Arctic glaciers and icebergs?
Venue: Large Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography

Evidence clearly shows that the world’s ice is melting and that catastrophes are likely to follow, if they aren’t occurring already. But how can we address climate change and work toward climate justice when so much of our relationship with Arctic ice is driven by economic and cultural practices
that perpetuate systems of inequality, commodification, and domination — the very systems that produced and now perpetuate anthropogenic warming? This presentation focuses on Greenland glaciers and icebergs in the North Atlantic Ocean to expose some of these embedded contradictions in the way we study, narrate, and interact with Arctic ice, even in the work supposedly meant to reduce climate change impacts. The goal is to develop new stories and studies of ice, to work toward greater glacier justice.

# Thursday 30th April 2020, 2.00pm - Johanne Bruun (University of Cambridge)
[online] Researching the field at home: the field and its doubles
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Virtual Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Thursday 12th March 2020, 2.00pm - Alice Oates (University of Cambridge)
[Cancelled] ‘No work before breakfast’: Putting people first at Halley Bay research station, Antarctica
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Tuesday 3rd March 2020, 4.30pm - Max Jones (University of Manchester)
[POSTPONED] Fridtjof Nansen’s FRAM expedition and the Making of a Transnational Hero
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Lecture Theatre

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 19th February 2020, 1.00pm - Dr Chris Jeppesen, Department of History, University of Cambridge
Out of Africa: former Colonial Officials and objects of colonial memory
Venue: Seminar Room, Department of Geography

This paper combines oral history and material culture approaches to consider how former colonial officials who served in Africa (now mostly in their eighties and nineties) remember and memorialise colonial encounters within their contemporary homes. Many continue to live among colonial-era objects brought back upon their return from colonial territories. My research uses these objects to explore the confluence of memory, nostalgia and domestic display in shaping post-colonial narratives of empire and perpetuating forms of colonial knowledge in the present.

# Wednesday 19th February 2020, 11.00am - Morgan Seag (University of Cambridge)
Roundtable discussion on 'Intersectionality and International Polar Research'
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Tuesday 11th February 2020, 4.30pm - Sofia Gavrilova (University of Oxford)
Constructing the Other: representations of Arctic native communities in Russian regional museums
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Lecture Theatre

Abstract not available

# Thursday 6th February 2020, 2.00pm - Peter Martin (University of Cambridge)
Roundtable discussion on “Off the beaten track? Critical approaches to exploration studies”
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Thursday 30th January 2020, 2.00pm - Frances Marsh and Eleanor Peers (University of Cambridge)
Roundtable discussion on ‘Decolonising the Polar Library: Moving forward’
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Tuesday 28th January 2020, 4.30pm - Morgan Seag (University of Cambridge)
Gender and 20th century Antarctic fieldwork: Constructing and dismantling the 'ice ceiling'
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Lecture Theatre

Abstract not available

# Thursday 16th January 2020, 2.00pm - Zoia Tarasova (University of Cambridge)
Human Anxieties, Bovine Solutions: Political Subtexts of Native Cattle Conservation in Northeastern Siberia
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Thursday 5th December 2019, 2.00pm - Eavan O'Dochartaigh (Umeå University)
Arctic Visible: Picturing Indigenous Communities in the Nineteenth-Century Western Arctic
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 27th November 2019, 1.00pm - Dr Antonio Ferraz-de-Oliveira, Downing College
From Empire to Globalisation: Jean Gottmann's Political Geographies
Venue: Seminar Room, Department of Geography

Abstract not available

# Thursday 21st November 2019, 2.00pm - Ed Armston-Sheret (Royal Holloway, University of London)
The Selected Body: Investigating Ideas about Nerves and Constitutions in the Heroic Age of Polar Exploration
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Tuesday 19th November 2019, 4.30pm - Ingrid Medby (Oxford Brookes University)
From Arctic statehood to self: State personnel’s articulations of Arctic identity in Norway, Iceland, and Canada
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Lecture Theatre

Abstract not available

# Thursday 14th November 2019, 2.00pm - Eleanor Peers (University of Cambridge)
From Epic Bards to Pop Stars in North-East Siberia: Song as Patriotic Education
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 13th November 2019, 1.00pm - Dr Caroline Cornish, Royal Hollaway
Accumulate to circulate: cultures of exchange in nineteenth-century museums
Venue: Seminar Room, Department of Geography

Abstract not available

# Tuesday 12th November 2019, 5.00pm - Professor Melissa Leach, IDS, University of Sussex
Configuring and Contesting Planetary Health; Knowledge Politics in Ecologies of Disease
Venue: Large Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography

Contemporary imaginaries of ‘planetary health’ in the Anthropocene claim to address pressing global-scale predicaments, yet are contested by knowledges from different times, places and scales. In West Africa and beyond, I ask – are anthropocenic reconfigurations obscuring creative, everyday relationships between people and non-human natures in dealing with infectious threats and maintaining healthy lives and ecologies? Who is gaining and losing? How can we open up the politics of planetary health to a greater appreciation of diverse socio-natures, plurality and uncertainty?

# Thursday 7th November 2019, 2.00pm - Othniel Art Oomittuk Jr and Ellis Doeven (Visiting Artists, Alaska)
Introducing Tikigaq - Living with the Whale in the Arctic
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Thursday 31st October 2019, 2.00pm - Prem Gill (University of Cambridge)
"Minorities in Polar Research"-Network
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Tuesday 29th October 2019, 4.30pm - Vanessa Heggie (University of Birmingham)
Meat to Mittens: a short history of survival science and extreme physiology in the Arctic and Antarctic regions
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Lecture Theatre

Abstract not available

# Thursday 24th October 2019, 2.00pm - John Woitkowitz (University of Cambridge)
Science Policy Workshop Report/Arctic Circle Assembly 2019
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 16th October 2019, 1.00pm - Dr Rob Bellamy, University of Manchester
Clumsy solutions for climate change: whose knowledge is needed?
Venue: Seminar Room, Department of Geography

Abstract not available

# Tuesday 15th October 2019, 2.00pm - Willy Topkok (Independent Artist, Alaska)
Life in Alaska as an Inupiaq Artist
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Friday 16th August 2019, 11.00am - Aki Tonami (University of Tsukuba)
Japan and its Arctic identity: Forming a narrative about the region
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Thursday 20th June 2019, 11.00am - Mia Bennett (University of Hong Kong)
The Sublimity of Sublimating Ice: Ruins of the Anthropocene
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Thursday 13th June 2019, 11.00am - Alex Partridge (The Polar Museum)
'Museum Entanglements: acquisitions, engagement and exhibitions at the Polar Museum
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Thursday 6th June 2019, 11.00am - Elizabeth Lewis Williams (University of East Anglia)
Antarctic Building and Dwelling: the Poetics of the 'Wide, White Page'
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Thursday 23rd May 2019, 11.00am - Elizabeth A. Walsh (Department of Anthropology)
‘They Should Do It Themselves’: Settler Affect and Indigenous Sovereignty on Alaska’s North Slope
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Thursday 16th May 2019, 11.00am - Otso Kortekangas (Stockholm University and KTH Royal Institute of Technology)
‘Indigenous’ avant la lettre. The Origin and Livelihoods of the Sámi in European Scholarly Thought 1930-1960
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Tuesday 14th May 2019, 4.30pm - Dorothea Wehrmann (Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik)
Critical Geopolitics of the Polar Regions: An Inter-American Perspective
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Lecture Theatre

Abstract not available

# Thursday 9th May 2019, 11.00am - Dina Brode-Roger (KU Leuven) & Sam Saville (Aberysthwyth)
Identity in Change/Svalbard Futures - with an introduction to the Svalbard Social Science Initiative
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Thursday 25th April 2019, 2.00pm - Maximilien Zahnd (University of Cambridge)
Can Taxation Help Indigenous Peoples Remap Space?: The Socio-Legal History of the Native Village of Kluti Kaah
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Thursday 14th March 2019, 11.00am - Ruth Maclennan (SPRI)
Ivan Chai and King Crabs
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Tuesday 12th March 2019, 4.30pm - Nancy Wachowich (University of Aberdeen)
Mittimatalik Arnait Miqsuqtuit Collective and the Art of Sealskin Sewing
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Lecture Theatre

Abstract not available

# Tuesday 5th March 2019, 4.30pm - Eleanor Rosamund Barraclough (Durham University)
'As Far North As Whale Hunters Go': The Medieval Arctic Environment, Experienced and Imagined
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Lecture Theatre

Abstract not available

# Thursday 28th February 2019, 2.00pm - Lill Rastad Bjørst (Aalborg University)
Partnerships in Mining: Stories, Emotions, and the Quest for Stable Relationships in the Greenlandic Mining Sector
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Thursday 14th February 2019, 2.00pm - Morgan Seag (University of Cambridge)
Roundtable discussion on "Gender in Polar Research"
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 13th February 2019, 1.00pm - Dr Joana Setzer, Grantham Institute, LSE
Knowledge, governance and scale in climate change litigation
Venue: Seminar Room, Department of Geography

Courts are playing an increasingly visible role in policy debates about climate change mitigation and adaptation, as well as climate change-related loss and damage. In this lunchtime seminar I will discuss how lawsuits are addressing the causes and consequences of climate change, such as the expansion of airports, the reliance on coal-powered energy and the climate-related erosion of habitats. First I will present some general trends on climate litigation – the actors and jurisdictions involved, and main strategies used. I will then explore three key and emerging themes in the interdisciplinary literature on climate change litigation: the relationship between litigation and governance; how time and scale feature in climate litigation; and the role of science in climate change litigation. Finally, I will discuss some of the challenges of using courts to address climate change, as well as the pressing need for research examining the outcomes and impact of climate change litigation.

# Thursday 31st January 2019, 11.00am - Bryan Lintott (University of Cambridge)
Antarctic Heritage and International Relations: Commemorating the Ross Sea Party
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 30th January 2019, 1.00pm - Dr Anshu Ogra, King's College London
Mapping the knowledge landscape: rethinking adaptation to climate change in the Western Ghats
Venue: Seminar Room, Department of Geography

This talk will argue for the need to rethink adaptation to climate change using the concept of situated knowledge. It will explore what is particularly unique about anthropogenic climate change as an environmental problem that unsettles our understanding of the humans as biological beings. The talk will build on the case study of coffee growers in South India.

# Tuesday 29th January 2019, 4.30pm - Jon Oldfield (University of Birmingham)
The role of the Arctic in the development of Soviet climate science
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Lecture Theatre

Abstract not available

# Friday 18th January 2019, 11.30am - Test
Test
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Tuesday 13th November 2018, 4.30pm - Adrian Howkins (University of Bristol)
Antarctic Mosaic: Integrating Science and History in the McMurdo Dry Valleys
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Lecture Theatre

Abstract not available

# Tuesday 6th November 2018, 5.00pm - Richard Powell and project team (University of Cambridge)
ERC ARCTIC CULT Launch Presentation
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Lecture Theatre

Abstract not available

# Tuesday 30th October 2018, 4.30pm - Brice Perombelon (University of Oxford)
From animism to speculation: representations of geopower among the Dene of Tulita, Northwest Territories, Canada
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Lecture Theatre

Abstract not available

# Tuesday 9th October 2018, 5.00pm - Richard Powell (University of Cambridge)
BOOK LAUNCH: Studying Arctic Fields: Cultures, Practices, and Environmental Sciences
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Lecture Theatre

This event is the Launch for Richard Powell’s new book, Studying Arctic Fields: Cultures, Practices, and Environmental Sciences, and is kindly sponsored by the Independent Social Research Foundation and McGill-Queen’s University Press. Please RSVP [jenny.dunstall@spri.cam.ac.uk] to attend.

# Monday 2nd July 2018, 4.30pm - Elizabeth Leane (University of Tasmania) and Carolyn Philpott (University of Tasmania)
Singing in the Wilderness: Antarctic Sledging Songs of the 'Heroic Age'
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Lecture Theatre

Abstract not available

# Thursday 28th June 2018, 11.00am - Morgan Seag and Bryan Lintott (University of Cambridge)
POLAR2018: Conversations and outcomes
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Thursday 14th June 2018, 11.00am - Alex Partridge (The Polar Museum)
The Polar Museum: Museum store tour and discussion
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Museum Store

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 13th June 2018, 1.00pm - Ruth Maclennan
Screening of Ruth Maclennan's film: Call of North
Venue: Small Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography

Call of North was filmed near the Arctic Circle on the White Sea in northwest Russia. It follows people’s relationships with the sea, and the changes associated with climate change and the geopolitical shift northward. The traumatic past of the ‘Zone’ – Stalin’s labour camps – continues to haunt. The economic collapse and recent political tensions are alluded to obliquely, hanging in the air.

North occupies a mythical place in Russia: ice maidens, woodcutters, wolves, bears, fishing and endless forests. The Arctic was the first Soviet frontier and is once again the focus of attention and speculation.

Call of North is the call of the voices of a place. The matter of place, the sounds of birds, sea, insects, grass, trees and wind, boats, trains and cars interweave with the voices of marine biologists, sailors, fishermen, a retired teacher, a kolkhoz worker and miner, a telephone engineer, a cook, a hotelier, a little boy, and many others who live here. They tell of their experiences. Some return to stories that haven’t been fully told or to unfinished business. There are warnings, too, of changes that are here already that could destroy what is left.

# Thursday 7th June 2018, 11.00am - Astrid Nonbo Andersen (Danish Institute for International Studies)
"This isn’t South Africa" – on using the analytical tools of memory studies and transitional justice in Greenland
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Friday 1st June 2018, 11.00am - Stine Alling Jacobsen (University of Oslo)
Cryolite Ghosts - histories of absence from Ivittuut
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Thursday 24th May 2018, 11.45am - Peter Martin (University of Oxford)
Supposed-to-be-Land: Indigenous Tales of the Beaufort Sea
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Thursday 24th May 2018, 11.00am - Morgan Seag (University of Cambridge)
Equal Opportunities on Ice: Sex discrimination legislation and British Antarctic science
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Monday 14th May 2018, 4.30pm - Nina Doering (University of Oxford)
'They don't know about the people who live here': Local non-participation in extractive resource management in Greenland
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Lecture Theatre

Abstract not available

# Friday 11th May 2018, 11.00am - Cameron Mackay (SPRI) and Jamie Sandall (SPRI)
Current MPhil dissertation research
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Thursday 10th May 2018, 4.30pm - Professor Esther Turnhout, Professor in Forest and Nature Conservation Policy, Wageningen University
Geographies of Knowledge annual lecture
Space of Biodiversity Expertise
Venue: Large Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography

In this talk, Esther explores a number of sites where biodiversity expertise is produced. These will include examples in the Netherlands and draw on her experiences as an expert and lead author for the Intergovernmental Platform for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES). Particular focus will be on two interrelated logics that are prominent in biodiversity expertise: that of policy relevance and that of assessment. Esther’s argument is that these two logics together prioritise model projections over other forms of expertise. The lecture concludes by discussing the scope for doing things differently and breaking through dominant logics.

# Thursday 3rd May 2018, 11.00am - Vegard Nergård (UIT The Arctic University of Norway)
The plural parent system in Saami reindeer herding families
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Thursday 26th April 2018, 11.00am - Henry Anderson-Elliott (SPRI)
Polar Social Sciences Workshop - Planning Discussion
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Monday 23rd April 2018, 4.30pm - Hanne Nielsen (University of Tasmania)
Brand Antarctica: Advertising and the South
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Lecture Theatre

Abstract not available

# Thursday 1st March 2018, 4.15pm - Professor Mike Hulme, Department of Geography, University of Cambridge
What sort of challenge is climate change? Fifty years of editorialising in ‘Nature’ and ‘Science’
Venue: Small Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography, Downing Site

Through their editorialising, leading international science journals such as Nature and Science shape and interpret the changing roles of science in society and exert considerable influence on scientific priorities and practices. I examine this ‘boundary work’ by examining 50 years of editorialising in these two journals through a longitudinal frame analysis of nearly 500 editorials. Although there are broad similarities between Nature and Science in the waxing and waning of editorialising attention given to climate change, there are also significant differences in how the challenges of climate change are framed. These differences can be attributed to these journals’ different institutional histories, place attachments and editorial styles. How Nature and Science editorialise climate change depends on where they are situated, both literally and metaphorically.

# Monday 19th February 2018, 4.30pm - Rick Knecht (University of Aberdeen)
Climate change, archaeology and tradition in an Alaskan Yup'ik Village
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Lecture Theatre

Abstract not available

# Friday 9th February 2018, 11.30am - Anna Stenport (Georgia Institute of Technology) and Scott MacKenzie (Queen's University, Kingston)
The Anxiety of Ice: Visualizing Climate Change and Arctic Moving Images
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Thursday 8th February 2018, 4.15pm - Professor Cheryl McEwan, Geography Department, Durham University
Protean geographies: Plants, politics and postcolonialism in South Africa
Venue: Small Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography, Downing Site

The significance of plants to the processes that form and reform human societies and politics has rarely been recognised by historians, historians of science or postcolonial theorists (Schiebinger 2004). Plants rarely feature in narratives of nation-building, transformation and everyday life. Drawing inspiration from research over several years in the Cape Floral Region of South Africa, I focus on the Protea flower, and the wider fynbos biome, to suggest that plants are not only important natural and cultural artefacts, but are embroiled in high-stake politics, social transformation and everyday lives. I explore how the Protea, as a symbol of change and promise, might also help navigate the apparent incommensurability of the politics of decolonisation and postcolonial theory.

# Monday 5th February 2018, 4.30pm - Thomas F. Thornton (University of Oxford)
Sacred Mountains as Flood Refuge Sites in Northwest North America
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Lecture Theatre

Abstract not available

# Thursday 1st February 2018, 5.30pm - Mike Hulme
This talk is part of the Christ's climate series, found here: http://www.csap.cam.ac.uk/events/climate-seminar-3-1-feb-2018/
The Cultural Functions of Climate
Venue: Plumb Auditorium, Christ's College

The idea of climate has always fulfilled important psychological, cultural and political functions. Climate may be understood according to aggregated statistics of weather or apprehended more intuitively, as a tacit idea held in social memory. But however defined, “climate” establishes certain expectations about the possibility of stable and meaningful human action in the world. In this talk I offer evidence for this argument drawing upon the environmental humanities — anthropology, literary and religious studies, environmental history and cultural geography, as I reflect on the reasons we might need to think differently in the Anthropocene about the idea of climate.

# Monday 29th January 2018, 4.30pm - Bryan Lintott (Scott Polar Research Institute)
Scott’s and Shackleton’s Huts: Antarctic Heritage and International Relations
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Lecture Theatre

Abstract not available

# Thursday 18th January 2018, 5.00pm - Professor Ananya Roy, The Institute on Inequality and Democracy, University of California, Los Angeles
Distinguished International Visiting Fellow Lecture
Racial banishment: Old and new forms of urban transformation in the United States
Venue: Large Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography, Downing Site

Cities such as Los Angeles have long been structured through technologies of spatial exclusion and frontiers of urban displacement.  Yet, social movements on the current frontlines of urban struggle insist that new types of violence are afoot.  Rejecting the standard vocabularies of urban studies, such as gentrification and neoliberalism, they call attention to processes of racial banishment.  In this talk, Professor Roy will detail key elements of racial banishment and indicate how urban transformation is articulated with necropolitics, including mass incarceration.  Thinking from Los Angeles, she will argue that what is at stake is not only a more robust analysis of urban transformations but also attention to the various forms of urban politics that are challenging racial capitalism.

# Wednesday 17th January 2018, 4.15pm - Professor Ananya Roy, The Institute on Inequality and Democracy, University of California, Los Angeles
Distinguished International Visiting Fellow Seminar
Postcolonial theory and the project of urban studies
Venue: Small Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography, Downing Site

In previous work, Professor Roy made the case for the relevance of postcolonial theory in the reconstruction of urban studies.  That reconstruction requires tackling the epistemological persistence of Eurocentrism in the production of conceptual categories and the deployment of modes of universalization.  In this seminar, Professor Roy will seek to continue such dialogues by pinpointing key aspects of Eurocentric thought as whiteness.  At a historical moment of resurgent white supremacy, she will examine the debates about this form of disciplinary power and its effects. Specifically, she suggests that postcolonial theory and critical race studies, especially when read together, can challenge the proprietary prerogatives of whiteness and make possible a different ontology of theorization and a different history of knowledge.

# Monday 27th November 2017, 4.30pm - Peter Martin (University of Oxford)
Re/Fram/ing Geography: Fridtjof Nansen at the Royal Geographical Society c.1888-1914
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Lecture Theatre

Abstract not available

# Monday 6th November 2017, 4.30pm - Jean de Pomereu (Research Associate, Scott Polar Research Institute)
The meaning of Indlandsis: a cultural history of ice sheets
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Lecture Theatre

Abstract not available

# Friday 16th June 2017, 11.30am - Bryan Lintott (SPRI)
The Central Intelligence Agency and Antarctica: 1947-59
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Tuesday 13th June 2017, 4.30pm - P.J. Capelotti (Professor of Anthropology, Penn State University)
Polar Opposites: American and Norwegian voices in the exploration of Franz Josef Land
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Lecture Theatre

Abstract not available

# Friday 2nd June 2017, 11.30am - Elizabeth Walsh (Social Anthropology, Cambridge)
Cultural institutions and Iñupiat identity in Utqiaġvik
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Friday 26th May 2017, 11.30am - Victoria Herrmann (SPRI)
Making a broader impact with polar research
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Friday 12th May 2017, 11.30am - Alex Partridge (Archaeology, Cambridge)
Census making and “Becoming Peoples”
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Friday 5th May 2017, 11.30am - Henry Anderson-Elliot (SPRI) and Morgan Seag (SPRI)
Architectures and built environments in the Polar Regions
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Friday 28th April 2017, 11.30am - Michael Bravo (SPRI)
Polar Social Sciences Workshop - Welcome Back
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Friday 10th March 2017, 11.30am - Johanna Grabow (Leipzig University and SPRI)
Antarctica in contemporary fiction
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Friday 3rd March 2017, 11.30am - Bryan Lintott (SPRI)
Quantarctica: Polar humanities and social science database
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Friday 24th February 2017, 11.30am - Penny Goodman (SPRI)
Education in Inuit communities in Canada
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Friday 17th February 2017, 11.30am - Matthew Jull (University of Virginia)
Arctic architecture and design
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Friday 10th February 2017, 11.30am - Corine Wood-Donnelly (SPRI)
Roundtable discussion: Current events in the Arctic and Antarctic
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Friday 3rd February 2017, 11.30am - Henry Anderson-Elliott (SPRI)
Conducting fieldwork in the Arctic
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Friday 27th January 2017, 11.30am - Morgan Seag (SPRI)
Arctic and Antarctic research at Cambridge: Polar Social Sciences Workshop planning
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Friday 25th November 2016, 11.30am - Alex Partridge (Archaeology, Cambridge)
Arctic sovereignty and museum collections
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Friday 18th November 2016, 11.30am - Penny Goodman (SPRI)
Interdisciplinary social science and humanities perspectives on climate change in the Arctic
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Friday 11th November 2016, 11.30am - Henry Anderson-Elliott (SPRI)
Reframing the conservation of polar bears in Svalbard
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Friday 28th October 2016, 11.30am - Morgan Seag (SPRI)
Polar Research at Cambridge: Research updates and group synergies
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 19th October 2016, 11.30am - Michael Bravo (SPRI)
Interdisciplinary polar social sciences and humanities at Cambridge
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Tuesday 9th February 2016, 2.30pm - Richard Powell (University of Oxford)
Writing the North? Geography and the disciplines of Circumpolar exceptionality
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Dr Richard Powell, Associate Professor of Human Geography at the University of Oxford, will be presenting a paper titled “Writing the North? Geography and the disciplines of Circumpolar exceptionality”.

# Tuesday 9th February 2016, 2.30pm - Roman Sidortsov (Scott Polar Research Institute)
Wrestling With Polar Bears: Risk, Power, Law, and Oil and Gas
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Roman Sitortsov, a doctoral candidate at SPRI, will be presenting on “Wrestling With Polar Bears: Risk, Power, Law, and Oil and Gas”

# Tuesday 19th January 2016, 2.30pm - Claire Warrior (National Maritime Museum) and Charlotte Connelly (Polar Museum, SPRI)
Double-bill: Polar Representation in Museums
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Claire Warrior, the Senior Curator of Exhibitions and a PhD Candidate at SPRI, will be discussing ‘Museum Representation and the new Polar Gallery at the National Maritime Museum”. This will be followed by questions and a discussion period.

Charlotte Connelly, the Curator for the Polar Museum and a PhD Candidate at both Cambridge and the Science Museum, will present on the difficulty of Polar representation beyond the Heroic Age. This will be followed by questions and a discussion period.

# Tuesday 17th November 2015, 2.00pm - Shane McCorristine (SPRI)
Polar Exploration and the 'Spectral Turn' in the Humanities
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Tuesday 17th November 2015, 2.00pm - Bryan Lintott (SPRI)
The Myth of Timelessness in the Polar Regions
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Friday 6th November 2015, 2.30pm - Brendan Plant (Downing College)
Volcanoes and Boundary Issues in International Law
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Tuesday 20th October 2015, 2.30pm - Dr. Michael Bravo, Geography and SPRI
Reflections on Analysis and Authorship in Polar Worlds
Venue: SPRI Seminar Room

Writing about the polar regions takes many forms. As politics and global commodity prices have dramatically increased, how has this impacted on polar writing and what are the implications for us as a community of scholarly practitioners? On the one hand, our goals and standards of academic success are defined by our institutions very clearly in terms of peer-reviewed articles and monographs. On the other hand, the circulation of informed opinion and analysis in the polar regions is taking place through a remarkably diverse range of media, forms, and genre: blogs, digests, videos, image banks, think tank reports, legal opinions environmental awareness-raising, as well as articles and books. In this discussion, I would like us to think about the way in which the use of these media and genres give rise to different kinds of authorial voices and ways of “narrating the polar regions”. This will give us an opportunity to reflect on how our own writing practices and aspirations can respond to this rapidly shifting field within which polar analysis circulates.

# Wednesday 22nd October 2014, 11.00am - David Turnbull (Melbourne University)
Indigenous Sovereignty beyond Nations
Venue: Hardy Building Room 101, Department of Geography, Downing Site

This will take the form of an early career reading group session led by Professor David Turnbull (Melbourne University). This session requires pre-registration with Dr. Shane McCorristine

# Monday 13th October 2014, 12.30pm - Niels Einarsson (Stefansson Institute, Iceland)
Fishing rights and financial capitalism in the Arctic: From common property to private ownership assets
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

The topic of fishing and access rights to marine resources is extremely important to coastal communities in the Arctic, as they are in the rest of the world for fishing societies from Ghana to Galicia. One of the major changes taking place, one could call it a social and historical transformation, is the privatisation of formerly common property resources, linking local livelihoods and community vibility to economic and financial processes of national and global markets and financial capitalism. Very little has been written about the social, indigenous and other Arctic residents‘ human rights, and economic and political implications of this recent shift in governance paradigm. This talk reports on ongoing anthropological and interdisciplinary research and deals with some of the aspects of this very rapid social change which is also coupled to processes of climate change and prospects of transarctic shipping and development of industrial megaprojects. The focus is on Iceland, Greenland and Norway but with data from other Arctic societies and fisheries.

# Thursday 1st May 2014, 4.30pm - Dr Kamrul Hossain (Arctic Centre, University of Lapland)
Arctic Maritime International Law
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Thursday 24th April 2014, 4.30pm - Marionne Cronin (University of Aberdeen)
The Topsy-Turvy Arctic: Navigating the Polar Airspace
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Thursday 6th March 2014, 4.30pm - Peter Schweitzer (Austrian Polar Research Institute)
The social life of Arctic transportation networks
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Thursday 20th February 2014, 1.15pm - Yaël Schlick (Queen's University at Kingston)
"Periodizing Modern Antarctica, or What is the Legacy of the Heroic Age?"
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 13th February 2013, 4.00pm - John MacDonald, Carolyn MacDonald, Wim Rasing
The Journals of William Hooper: Inuit ethnographer and evangelical
Venue: Scott Polar Research Institute, Seminar Room

The Arctic humanities are a broad and developing field, encompassing subjects from the social impact of environmental change to the use of indigenous mapping techniques in western geographical knowledge. Taking a broad historical and circumpolar perspective, this seminar series explores the encounters and engagements between different actors, communities, and systems of knowledge in the Arctic. How do historical encounters and passages continue to shape issues of contemporary governance in the polar regions? This seminar series showcases the interdisciplinary strengths of SPRI while also engaging with the current research of visiting and invited scholars.