skip to primary navigation skip to content
 

 

Research projects

Research projects currently being undertaken on this theme include:

Humanitarian crises, population displacement and epidemic diseases, 1901–2010

Humanitarian crises, population displacement and epidemic diseases, 1901–2010

Wars, political upheavals, environmental disasters and other forms of humanitarian crisis have served to precipitate the mass displacement of populations since biblical times. This project examines the mass population displacement–disease link attributable to the nexus of causes – including war, political repression, development projects, environmental change and disasters. The overarching aim is to produce the first systematic study of the global geography of epidemic-prone infectious diseases associated with mass population displacements in the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries.

Mortality and epidemiological change in Manchester, 1750-1850

Mortality and epidemiological change in Manchester, 1750-1850

In the new northern industrial conurbation of Manchester, did a fifteen-fold population growth over the century before 1850 impact on survival chances steadily across the period, or only after 1820? What were the underlying causes of the stagnation in life expectancy that England is thought to have experienced during early industrialisation?

Long-run cause of death series for national populations

Long-run cause of death series for national populations

What changes occurred in the level and age structure of cause-specific mortality in the late nineteenth century? An annual cause of death data series for England and Wales 1848-1900 has been compiled to answer this question.

The transformation of the urban epidemiological regime, 1750-1850

The transformation of the urban epidemiological regime, 1750-1850

This transformation of the urban epidemiological regime is the subject of a long-run research project which uses a variety of sources to investigate mortality change in northwest Europe in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

Infant mortality by social status in Georgian London

Infant mortality by social status in Georgian London

Were richer children born between 1752 and 1812 in the populous Westminster parish of St Martin-in-the-Fields more likely to die at young ages than poorer children?

The Demography of Early Modern London circa 1550 to 1750

The Demography of Early Modern London circa 1550 to 1750

In a rapidly expanding metropolis where population growth was driven by in-migration, how heavy was the mortality burden on Londoners' children, and what choices did they make when entering marriage and starting a family?

Longevity changes and their determinants in England and her European neighbours c.1600-1900

Longevity changes and their determinants in England and her European neighbours c.1600-1900

In the analysis of contemporary adult longevity there has been a shift away from explanations that focus on adult life-style determined risk factors towards an emphasis on biologically programmed influences in utero or in very early infancy. This project uses historic data sets to assess the relevance of the aforementioned approaches under conditions primarily of natural (uncontrolled) fertility and mortality regimes dominated by a high incidence of infectious or epidemic disease.

The geography of crime and disorder: offences, offenders and victimization

The geography of crime and disorder: offences, offenders and victimization

A number of projects fall under this broad heading and currently involve collaboration with colleagues at Cambridge in Geography as well as the Institute of Criminology. The methodological orientation of all this work is quantitative (spatial analysis, spatial modelling and using GIS for data management and display) because research typically uses large police recorded crime datasets.

Geographical epidemiology: air quality and public health

Geographical epidemiology: air quality and public health

This research investigates the importance of air pollution as a risk factor for strokes for coronary heart disease and stroke, by making extensive use of GIS technology and spatial data analysis.

Earlier projects