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Martin Rogers MSc BSc (Int)

Martin Rogers MSc BSc (Int)

PhD candidate, Cambridge Coastal Research Unit

Researching the use of remote sensing and machine learning techniques to describe and predict shoreline change dynamics along the East Coast of England.

Biography

Career

  • October 2018- PhD candidate. Funded through the Data, Risk and Environmental Analytical Methods (DREAM) Centre for Doctorate Training (funded by the Natural Environment Research Council)
  • May 2016- September 2018: National Flood Adviser, National Farmers Union
  • May 2015- May 2016: Environment Adviser, National Farmers Union
  • October 2011- May 2015: Environment Officer, Environment Agency

Qualifications

  • 2014-2016: MSc (Distinction) in River Basin Dynamics and Management with Geographical Informational Systems (GIS), University of Leeds (part-time)
  • 2007-2011: BSc Int (First Class) in Physical Geography, University of Leeds. International year of study at School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Queensland, Australia

Awards and scholarships

  • University of Leeds Alumni Bursary, £560, October 2016
  • University of Leeds School of Geography Scholarship, £1500, October 2014
  • Deans Award for exemplary work, University of Queensland, June 2010
  • Deans Award for exemplary work, University of Queensland, December 2009

Research

During my undergraduate and Master's degree I focussed on the application of GIS, remote sensing and statistical analysis to study riverine processes. Within my MSc thesis I applied Structure for Motion (SfM) and remote sensing technologies (Lidar data) to investigate the feasibility of river re-meandering schemes in Uredale, Yorkshire, UK.

My PhD research will further my skillsets by exploiting the explosion in publically available Big Data and remote sensing (satellite imagery) pertaining to shoreline change and the environmental factors driving these observed dynamics. Machine learning techniques (Neural Networks) will be used to predict future change and to identify dominant causes of observed dynamics. The impacts on vulnerable receptors (communities and land covers) in the coastal zone will be investigated. Shoreline change predictions will be compared with those contained within Shoreline Management Plans, which are used to identify future risk management priorities.

Outside of Academia, I have worked for a range of flood and coastal risk management stakeholders, providing me with first-hand experience of policy creation and regulation in flood and coastal risk management. I led the National Farmers Union's (NFU's) response to the Winter 2015/16 floods in Cumbria, produced the NFU's flood response plan and generated a report highlighting innovative methods for generating flood and coastal risk management funding.

Publications

Reports

  • Rogers, M. and Möller, I. 2019. Suffolk Marine Pioneer Deben. Wave protection provided by salt marshes. A GIS and remote sensing basic analysis approach. Cambridge Coastal Research Unit, Department of Geography, University of Cambridge.
  • Stratford, C., House, A., Old, G., Acreman, M., Dueñas-Lopez, M. A., Miller, J., Rogers, M. and Newman, J. 2017. Do trees in UK-relevant river catchments influence fluvial flood peaks? A systematic review. 30pp. Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. Wallingford, UK
  • Rogers, M. 2016. Can Structure from Motion determine the efficacy of river re-meandering as a natural flood management measure? Available online: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Martin_Rogers7

Conference contributions

  • Rogers, M. 2019. Exploiting satellite technology and machine learning to describe and predict coastal change and hazard regulation. Poster session at Machine Learning and Environmental Science Workshop, British Antarctica Survey, Cambridge.
  • Rogers, M. and Möller, I. 2019. Wave protection provided by salt marshes. A GIS and remote sensing basic analysis approach. Suffolk Marine Pioneer Project: Deben Estuary. Ipswich, UK.
  • Rogers, M. 2019. Humans on the edge: Exploiting satellite technology and machine learning to describe and predict coastal change and hazard regulation. Oral presentation and poster at the DREAM Symposium, Birmingham.

Other

  • Rogers, M. 2016. Working with natural processes to reduce flood risk. Royal Geographical Society. London.
  • Rogers, M. 2016. Agricultural perception and implementation of Natural Flood Management. Centre for Ecology and Hydrology. London.
  • Rogers, M. 2015. Practical Applications of soil management. British Ecological Survey. London.