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Emily Potter

Emily Potter

PhD student

"Localised wind systems in the Nepalese Himalaya: Factors influencing their development and their effects on glacio-meteorological conditions." - joint project between the Scott Polar Research Institute (SPRI) and the British Antarctic Survey (BAS)

Biography

I study meteorology in the Nepalese Himalayas, through a mixture of modelling and fieldwork. At present my research is based in the Khumbu valley, Nepal. I am particularly focussed on how the snow and ice in the valley affect the local meteorology, and the subsequent impact on temperature, cloud and precipitation.

Career

  • 2015-present: PhD in Polar Studies. British Antarctic Survey and Scott Polar Research Institute, University of Cambridge (Wolfson College).
  • 2014-2015: MSc Mathematical Modelling, University College London.
  • 2012-2014: Mathematics Teacher

Qualifications

  • 2015-present: PhD in Polar Studies. British Antarctic Survey and Scott Polar Research Institute, University of Cambridge (Wolfson College).
  • 2014-2015: MSc Mathematical Modelling, University College London.
  • 2008-2012: MMath in Mathematics, University of Oxford.

Research

The Himalayan region holds the largest quantity of snow and ice outside of the Polar Regions, and the meltwater from this contributes to the major rivers in Asia. There is huge uncertainty as to how snowpacks and glaciers are affected by atmospheric processes in the Himalayas. In addition to synoptic weather, localised wind systems play a big role in the regional climate in individual valleys. The valley winds in the region are complicated by the presence of glacier winds, caused by the snow and ice cooling a thin layer of air directly above the surface.

My PhD aims to investigate the factors which affect the development of the valley winds in the Khumbu valley. It also looks at the effect of the surface conditions (snow and ice) on the temperature, and the subsequent impact on other weather. I am particularly focussed on atmospheric processes which might affect or be affected by the glaciers in the region.

Teaching

  • Supervisor, Natural Sciences Tripos, 1A: Maths for Natural Sciences (2016-2017)

External activities

  • Talk at the Science Museum, London with the Science on a Sphere project (2017)