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See also: Earlier news | News from the Scott Polar Research Institute

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# Green Thinking podcast series - BBC & AHRC

BBC and the Arts and Humanities Research Council have launched a series of 26 podcasts, 26 minutes long, ahead of COP26 this November. Each episode will take a deep-dive into the latest research on climate and social processes. Ayesha Siddiqi has been discussing her research in the new episode on Climate and Conflict on Green Thinking.

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# Decolonising Cambridge Geography - panel discussion

A panel event was held on 21st May 2021 on Decolonising Cambridge Geography. A video of the event is now available.

Professor Bhaskar Vira, Head of Department; Geography was joined by alumnus Dominic Waughray (World Economic Forum); Professor Sarah Radcliffe, who convenes the Decolonising Cambridge Geography Working Group; and current Geography students, Matipa Mukondiwa and Victoria Ayodeji, as they discuss initiatives being taken to Decolonise Cambridge Geography.

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# Co-designing publics podcast

A new series of podcasts, bringing together academics, activists and urban designers to discuss the nature of the public realm, have been released. These comprise part of Dr Charlotte Lemanski's AHRC Researcher Networking Grant on Co-designing publics, with Prof Aseem Inam and Juan Usubillaga (Cardiff University).

The first podcast debates the difference between the public realm and public space, and includes contributions from Charlotte Lemanski (Cambridge), Aseem Inam (Cardiff), AbdouMaliq Simone (Sheffield), Melanie Lombard (Sheffield), Neha Sami (IIHS, India), Simon Springer (Newcastle, Australia), and Fernando Lara (Texas, USA).

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# Film as method

Natura urbana: the Brachen of Berlin (Dir.: Matthew Gandy, 2017)

In his latest article "Film as method in the geohumanities" Professor Matthew Gandy reflects on how documentary film has a distinctive role to play in expanding the research imagination, enhancing pedagogic practice, reaching new audiences, and producing unique cultural artifacts. At the same time, however, he notes that film is also entrained in complex debates concerning the verisimilitude of representational practices and the wider institutional context for the production and evaluation of knowledge.

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# Catz Chats on Geography

The last 'Catz Chats' at St Catharine's College was on the subject of Geography. It is now available on YouTube and features insights from Emeritus Professor Ron Martin (1974), Dr Ivan Scales (2008) and Dr Ian Willis (1989).

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# Rebuilding economies after the pandemic

Writing in LSE Blogs, Ron Martin (Emeritus Professor of Economic Geography) and other researchers argue that the task of governments is not simply to build 'back' better after COVID-19, but to rebuild forward better, towards an inclusive model of economic growth.

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# Closing gaps for good: Ensuring equitable recovery in a post-pandemic world

Former PhD student in the Department, Tara Cookson, spoke at an event, Closing gaps for good: Ensuring equitable recovery in a post-pandemic world, as part of celebrations of the 20th anniversary of the Gates Cambridge Scholarship Programme.

As we begin to emerge from the crisis, we must create an inclusive society that capitalises on the full potential of all its citizens, to eliminate inequality and poverty. The poverty cycle is inextricably linked with women's education and career opportunities. Closing the gender gap will narrow the poverty divide and increase opportunities for more than 50 per cent of the world's population.

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# Industrial Cambridge From Above: A Century of Aerial Photography

Cambridge Museum of Technology has launched a new video (40 minutes) which explores a century of Cambridge's changing industrial landscape, as viewed from aerial photography. The video features images from the Department's CUCAP (Cambridge University Collection of Aerial Photography) collection.

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# Decolonising Cambridge Geography - panel event

Cambridge Geography recognises that colonial structures and power relations remain embedded in University institutions, and that these structures silence and marginalise groups which historically have not been fully validated and included in teaching, learning and research. The department is seeking to change these relations of power and how knowledge is produced and shared.

Join Professor Bhaskar Vira, Head of Department; Geography alumnus Dominic Waughray (World Economic Forum); Professor Sarah Radcliffe, who convenes the Decolonising Cambridge Geography Working Group; and current Geography students, Matipa Mukondiwa and Victoria Ayodeji, as they discuss initiatives being taken to Decolonise Cambridge Geography.

The panel will highlight experiences of past and current students of Geography at Cambridge. There will be a 20 minute Q&A session following the talk. Tickets available here.

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# Fibre-optics used to take the temperature of Greenland Ice Sheet

RESPONDER team members installing borehole sensors after drilling to the bed of Store Glacier (Rob Law and RESPONDER team)

Scientists have used fibre-optic sensing to obtain the most detailed measurements of ice properties ever taken on the Greenland Ice Sheet. Their findings will be used to make more accurate models of the future movement of the world's second-largest ice sheet, as the effects of climate change continue to accelerate.

The research team, led by Dr Poul Christoffersen from the Scott Polar Research Institute, used a new technique in which laser pulses are transmitted in a fibre-optic cable to obtain highly detailed temperature measurements from the surface of the ice sheet all the way to the base, more than 1000 metres below.

"With typical sensing methods, we can only attach about a dozen sensors onto the cable, so the measurements are very spaced out," said first author Robert Law, a PhD candidate at the Scott Polar Research Institute. "But by using a fibre-optic cable instead, essentially the whole cable becomes a sensor, so we can get precise measurements from the surface all the way to the base." The researchers found three layers of ice in the glacier. The thickest layer consists of cold and stiff ice which formed over the last 10,000 years. Below, they found older ice from the last ice age, which is softer and more deformable due to dust trapped in the ice. What surprised the researchers the most, however, was a layer of warm ice more than 70 metres thick at the bottom of the glacier. "We know this type of warm ice from far warmer Alpine environments, but here the glacier is producing the heat by deforming itself," said Law.

Read the full paper: Robert Law et al. 'Thermodynamics of a fast-moving Greenlandic outlet glacier revealed by fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing.' Science Advances (2021). doi:10.1126/sciadv.abe7136

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