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Department of Geography

 

Department of Geography at the General Assembly of the European Geosciences Union (EGU) 2018

Department of Geography at the General Assembly of the European Geosciences Union (EGU) 2018

Several staff, postdocs, PhD students and research associates within the Department of Geography and Scott Polar Research Institute will be showcasing their research at the General Assembly of the European Geosciences Union (EGU) 8-13 April 2018, the largest geosciences meeting in Europe. Details of the presentations and further information on the various research groups can be found below.

Aleksandr Montelli

Poster presentation

  • Topic: 3D seismic evidence of buried iceberg ploughmarks from the mid-Norwegian continental margin: a Quaternary record of North Atlantic Current variability

  • Tuesday, 10 Apr 2018, 17:30-19:00, Hall X4, Poster board X4.18

  • Abstract | Session

Andrew Williamson

Poster presentation:

  • Topic: Investigating potential controls on rapid surface lake drainage in West Greenland

  • Friday 13 April, 13:30–15:00, Hall X4, X4.20

Oral presentation

  • Topic: Remote sensing of supraglacial lakes in Greenland using a combined Sentinel-2 and Landsat-8 record

  • Friday 13th April, 13:45–14:00, Room N1

Catherine Martin-Jones

Poster presentation (presented by Christine Lane)

  • Topic: A ~260 ka eruptive history for Kilimanjaro derived from Lake Challa sediments

  • Wed, 11 Apr, 17:30–19:00, Hall X1 (poster 127)

  • Abstract | Session

Christine Lane

Session convening (& linked poster)

  • Topic: Diagnosing past climate mechanisms through the INTegration of Ice core, MArine and TErrestrial records

  • Thu, 12 Apr, 08:30–10:00 / Room E2 and 17:30–19:00 / Hall X5 (poster 252)

  • Poster abstract | Session

Poster presentation

  • Topic: A Holocene cryptotephra record of Central Kenyan Rift volcanism from Lake Victoria sediments

  • Tuesday 10th April 17:30 - 19:00, Hall X1 (poster 371)

  • Abstract | Session

plus co-authored presentations:

Corinne Benedek

Poster presentation

  • Topic: All-season observation of surface and near-surface lakes on the Greenland Ice Sheet using Sentinel-1 C-Band SAR.

  • Friday 13th April 13:30 - 15:00, Hall X4 Poster 21

  • Abstract | Session

Helen Brooks

Poster presentation

  • Topic: Geotechnical properties of salt marsh and tidal flat substrates at Tillingham, Essex

  • Friday, 13th April, 17:30–19:00, Hall X1

  • Abstract | Session

James Pollard

Interactive poster presentation (PICO)

  • Topic: Geomorphological Risk: investigating the relationship between geomorphology, erosion and flood risk at the coast.

  • Tuesday 10th April 13:30-15:00, PICO Spot 1

  • Abstract | Session

Mark Schuerch

Oral presentation

  • Topic: Resilience of coastal wetlands to sea level rise: A global-scale assessment.

  • Friday 13th April 15:45 - 16:00, Room L4/5

  • Abstract | Session

Poster presentation

  • Topic: Identifying the drivers for temporal variations in salt marsh sedimentation: a case study from the UK east coast.

  • Friday 13th April 17:30 - 19:00, Hall A, Poster 259

  • Abstract | Session

Oliver Taherzadeh

Oral presentation

  • Topic: Navigating the Global Resource Nexus: Methods, Priorities, and Policies

  • Tuesday 10th April 08:30–8:45, Room M1

  • Abstract | Session

Session Co-Convenor

  • 'ERE1.2 Energy and environmental system interactions – Policy and modelling'

  • Session

Rachael Turton

Poster presentation

  • Topic: Addressing the source sink debate with an integrated observation, experimental and modelling study in Harvard Forest

  • Thursday 12th April 17.30 - 19.00, Hall A Poster 423

  • Abstract | Session

Annemarie Eckes

Poster presentation (presented by Rachael Turton)

  • Topic: Modelling xylogenesis

  • Tuesday 10th April 17.30 - 19.00, Hall X5 Poster 308

  • Abstract | Session

Rebecca Dell

Poster presentation

  • Topic: Changing surface hydrology, strain rates and fracture distribution across Nivlisen and Riiser-Larsen Ice Shelves, Queen Maud Land, Antarctica

  • Wed, 11 Apr, 17:30–19:00, Hall X5, X5.415

  • Abstract | Session

Samuel Cook

Poster presentation

  • Topic: modelling the subglacial hydrological systems of tidewater glaciers.

  • Wednesday 11th April, 17:30-19:00, Hall X5

Susan Brooks

Poster presentation

  • Topic: Barrier dynamics in Disaster Risk Reduction: storm impacts and recovery assessment from Remote Sensing

  • Friday, 13th April, 17:30–19:00 Hall X1

  • Abstract | Session

Tom Chudley

Poster presentation

  • Topic: Applying new UAV photogrammetric methods to the study of Greenland Ice Sheet dynamics.

  • Tuesday 10th April 17:30 - 19:00, Hall X2 Poster 55

  • Abstract | Session

Antonio Abellan

(Former postdoctoral researcher, now at University of Leeds)

Oral presentation (with input from Tom Chudley)

  • Topic: Investigating glacier dynamics using 3D point clouds.

  • Tuesday 10th April 13:30 - 13:45, Room N2

  • Abstract | Session

Iris Möller

Co-authored presentations

  • Abstract - H Brooks et al. Geotechnical properties of salt marsh and tidal flat substrates at Tillingham, Essex.
  • Abstract - Pollard et al. Geomorphological Risk: investigating the relationship between geomorphology, erosion and flood risk at the coast.

Tom Spencer

Co-authored presentations

  • Abstract - H Brooks et al. Geotechnical properties of salt marsh and tidal flat substrates at Tillingham, Essex.
  • Abstract - Pollard et al. Geomorphological Risk: investigating the relationship between geomorphology, erosion and flood risk at the coast.
  • Abstract - S Brooks et al. Barrier dynamics in Disaster Risk Reduction: storm impacts and recovery assessment from Remote Sensing.
  • Abstract - Schuerch et al. Resilience of coastal wetlands to sea level rise: A global-scale assessment.
  • Abstract - Schuerch and Spencer. Identifying the drivers for temporal variations in salt marsh sedimentation: a case study from the UK east coast.

About our research groups

Further information on research groups:

The Biogeography and Biogeomorphology Research Group

The research of members of the Biogeography and Biogeomorphology Group is concerned with the interactions and feedbacks between organisms (including humans) and their environments in the past, present and uncertain future. While biogeography focuses on the environmental, physiological and ecological constraints to the dispersal of organisms from local to regional and global scales, biogeomorphology focuses on the direct and indirect influences of organisms on earth surface processes, as well as the role of geomorphology in ecosystem functioning and resilience.

The Biogeography and Biogeomorphology Research Group includes the Cambridge Coastal Research Unit:

The CCRU provides scientifically-informed input for the better management of shorelines and their associated ecosystems. It facilitates and promotes multidisciplinary research into all aspects of shallow water marine science by bringing together natural and social scientists in Cambridge University and other governmental and non-governmental research institutions. Through this research, the CCRU informs coastal management and decision-making within governmental and non-governmental institutions and organisations in the UK and overseas.

Find out about CCRU's presentations and talks at the EGU.

Glaciology and Glacial Geology Research Group:

Members of the GGG Group, largely based at the Scott Polar Research Institute, research the Earth's cryosphere (glaciers and ice sheets, sea ice and permafrost) and the landscapes affected by the cryosphere. Research into Earth's cryosphere takes place using a variety of geophysical techniques, including ground-, ship-, airborne and satellite-based observations, in order to investigate glaciers and ice sheets, to identify their environmental settings, and to pinpoint the processes that govern their flow. The research also includes development of numerical modelling techniques, allowing a better understanding of the processes which control the cryosphere, and more accurate predictions of future change.

Climate and Environmental Dynamics Research Group

CED conducts research on past, present and future climate and environmental variability to understand the mechanisms, evolution and impacts of global climate and environmental systems. Their research explores how different components of the Earth's system respond to, and modulate, climatic changes at various spatiotemporal scales. A wide range of local to global proxy data, as well as physical and biological models, is employed to illuminate processes acting within and between the earth's atmosphere, biosphere, lithosphere and cryosphere. Among others, sedimentary and volcanic archives, tree-rings, historical sources and palaeoclimate models, are compiled and analysed to enhance our understanding of how past natural and anthropogenic climate variability has shaped our planet, and human history.