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Department of Geography

Undergraduate study

Undergraduate study

Geography is one of the most exciting subjects to study at university. We live in an interdependent world caught up in chains of events which span the globe. We depend upon an increasingly fragile physical environment, whose complex interactions require sophisticated analysis and sensitive management.

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Postgraduate study

Postgraduate study

The Department has a large community of postgraduate students. Many are working for the PhD degree, awarded on the basis of individual research and requiring three years of full-time study. The Department of Geography also runs a range of Masters/MPhil courses.

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People in the Department

People in the Department

The Department’s staff publish regularly in hundreds of separate publications, and attract research funding from a wide variety of sources.

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Research groups

Research groups

Research in the Department of Geography, arranged across six Thematic Research Groups and two Institutes, covers a broad range of topics, approaches, and sites of study. Our expertise, individually and in collaboration, is both conceptual and applied.

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Learning from the Great Tide

31st January, 2023

 

On the exact 70th anniversary of the catastrophic 1953 storm surge along the east coast of England, listen to Tom Spencer, Emeritus Professor of Coastal Dynamics, Department of Geography talk about the governmental response at the time, the challenges for the management of low-lying coasts now, and the work of the Cambridge Coastal Research Unit in a BBC Radio 4 programme, Seriously... Learning from the Great Tide.

COP27 and the era of loss and damage: from periphery to core

18th January, 2023

 

Final year PhD student Friederike Hartz attended the COP27 negotiations in Sharm el Sheikh in November. Here in this post for the Oxford University Politics Blog, Freddie provides a historical perspetive on the rise of the 'loss and damage' agenda, explaining how what was once regarded as a problem of the periphery, loss and damage has now become a core concern in international climate negotiations.

Runaway West Antarctic ice retreat can be slowed by climate-driven changes in ocean temperature

17th January, 2023

 

An international team of researchers, led by Dr. Frazer Christie, has combined satellite imagery and climate and ocean records to obtain the most detailed understanding yet of how West Antarctica is responding to climate change.

Their results, published in the journal Nature Communications, show that while West Antarctica continues to retreat, the pace of ice melting has recently slowed across its most vulnerable sector in-sync with changes in atmosphere and ocean conditions offshore. Ultimately, the research implies that runaway, ice-sheet-wide collapse isn't inevitable, depending on how the climate changes over the next few decades.

The study was supported by the Prince Albert II of Monaco Foundation, the Carnegie Trust for the Universities of Scotland, the Natural Environment Research Council, the US National Science Foundation, the International Thwaites Glacier Collaboration project and the European Space Agency.

Launch of RGS Report on Law and Geography

16th January, 2023

 

An Royal Geographical Society Report was launched today examining how geographical ideas impact legal processes. Co-authored by Prof. Alex Jeffrey, the report draws on surveys and interviews with geographers across the UK to explore the often-hidden role of geographical knowledge in impacting legal processes. A key goal of the report is to make visible these endeavours, promote the importance of geography to public audiences, and to learn from geographers' experiences to provide better support and training for geographers in the future.

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  • 1st February 2023:
    POSTPONED: Occupational structures and the composition of the rich in pre-industrial Italy. Details…
    Quantitative History Seminar
  • 2nd February 2023:
    Wage labour and living standards in early modern England: evidence from Lancashire, 1580-1620. Details…
    Early Modern Economic and Social History Seminars
  • 3rd February 2023:
    The social and political life of Latin American infrastructures: Insights from the Ecuadorian Andes. Details…
    Infrastructural Geographies - Department of Geography
  • 7th February 2023:
    Political ecologists on the inside: insights from attending CBD COP15. Details…
    Political Ecology Group meetings
  • 7th February 2023:
    Antarctica is not one thing. Details…
    Scott Polar Research Institute - HCEP (Histories, Cultures, Environments and Politics) Research Seminars
  • 8th February 2023:
    Revealing disease ecology from historical records over the last seven centuries. Details…
    The Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure - seminar series
  • More seminars…