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Undergraduate study

Geography is one of the most exciting subjects to study at university. We live in an interdependent world caught up in chains of events which span the globe. We depend upon an increasingly fragile physical environment, whose complex interactions require sophisticated analysis and sensitive management.

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Graduate study

The Department has a large community of postgraduate students. Many are working for the PhD degree, awarded on the basis of individual research and requiring three years of full-time study. The Department of Geography also runs a range of Masters/MPhil courses.

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People in the Department

The Department's staff publish regularly in hundreds of separate publications, and attract research funding from a wide variety of sources.

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Research groups

Research in the Department of Geography, arranged across six Thematic Research Groups and two Institutes, covers a broad range of topics, approaches, and sites of study. Our expertise, individually and in collaboration, is both conceptual and applied.

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Tree Rings and Radiocarbon

20th September, 2018

 

Professor Ulf Büntgen is presenting a talk, Tree Rings and Radiocarbon, at the AMS Beyond 2020 Symposium at ETH in Zurich on Friday 21 September. The AMS Symposium presentations will be livestreamed tomorrow morning, with Professor Büntgen presenting at 11.45 (time local to Zurich).

Coastal management could prevent rising sea levels causing large scale loss of coastal wetlands

18th September, 2018

 

A new study, by a team of researchers led by members of the Department's Cambridge Coastal Research Unit, finds that coastal management could prevent rising sea levels causing large-scale loss of coastal wetlands.

Previous studies have predicted catastrophic coastal wetland loss as sea levels rise. However, this new research shows that the global area of coastal wetland could increase if coasts are managed so that they have alternative spaces to grow: areas where sediment could build up, uninhibited by built infrastructure such as sea walls and cities, and where wetland plants could develop. Coastal wetlands could then expand inland in response to sea level rise.

The research was led by Dr Mark Schuerch, former postdoctoral research fellow at CCRU (now University of Lincoln) with the CCRU Director Professor Tom Spencer and including Dr Ruth Reef (now University of Monash).

Charlotte Lemanski speaks at Speculative Infrastructures workshop, Sheffield

7th September, 2018

 

Charlotte Lemanski discusses her work at the Speculative Infrastructures workshop, held at the University of Sheffield 6-7 September, sponsored by the Urban Geography journal.

Discussing her recent research on infrastructural citizenship within the framework of 'displacement', she also explores the temporal nature of the displacement of expectations and hopes for South Africans awaiting public infrastructure.

New paper: Tree rings reveal globally coherent signature of cosmogenic radiocarbon events in 774 and 993 CE

6th September, 2018

 

Based on the largest ever volunteer effort by the international tree-ring community, including 67 scholars from 57 institutes around the world, the global extent and seasonal timing of the rapid increase in atmospheric Carbon-14 concentrations from the two largest cosmogenic events in 774 and 993 CE is presented for the first time ever.

The research team included the Department's Professor Ulf Büntgen, Professor Clive Oppenheimer, and Paul J. Krusic.

Sir David Attenborough joins a celebration of the Cambridge Masters in Conservation Leadership

4th September, 2018

 

Sir David Attenborough was at the University last week to join an event celebrating the achievements of the alumni of the Masters in Conservation Leadership. The event brought together, for the first time, over 120 alumni from the first eight cohorts of the Masters in Conservation Leadership, along with many of the conservation researchers and practitioners based in Cambridge who contribute to the delivery of the Masters course. The event was designed to celebrate the Masters, and to strengthen the global network of alumni, who come from over 70 different countries, so that it helps them to achieve enhanced conservation impact. The course is based in the Department of Geography.

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  • 9th October 2018:
    BOOK LAUNCH: Studying Arctic Fields: Cultures, Practices, and Environmental Sciences. Details…
    Scott Polar Research Institute - Histories, Cultures, Environments and Politics research seminars
  • 25th October 2018:
    Border crossings: geographies of class, gender, mobility and migration. Details…
    Centenary Lecture Series, Department of Geography
  • 30th October 2018:
    From animism to speculation: representations of geopower among the Dene of Tulita, Northwest Territories, Canada. Details…
    Scott Polar Research Institute - Histories, Cultures, Environments and Politics research seminars
  • 8th November 2018:
    Is sea level rise accelerating and what are the implications for coastal flooding? . Details…
    Department of Geography - main Departmental seminar series
  • 13th November 2018:
    Antarctic Mosaic: Integrating Science and History in the McMurdo Dry Valleys. Details…
    Scott Polar Research Institute - Histories, Cultures, Environments and Politics research seminars
  • 22nd November 2018:
    Climate Changed Urban Futures: imaginaries, experiments & justice in the Anthropocene city. Details…
    Centenary Lecture Series, Department of Geography
  • 28th November 2018:
    Rethinking Urban Nature. Details…
    ERC Research Presentations, Department of Geography
  • 29th January 2019:
    The role of the Arctic in the development of Soviet climate science. Details…
    Scott Polar Research Institute - Histories, Cultures, Environments and Politics research seminars
  • 31st January 2019:
    Climate change and water security in Africa. Details…
    Department of Geography - main Departmental seminar series
  • 7th February 2019:
    Bloody Geography: injured bodies and the spaces of modern war. Details…
    Centenary Lecture Series, Department of Geography
  • More seminars…