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Undergraduate study

Geography is one of the most exciting subjects to study at university. We live in an interdependent world caught up in chains of events which span the globe. We depend upon an increasingly fragile physical environment, whose complex interactions require sophisticated analysis and sensitive management.

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Graduate study

The Department has a large community of postgraduate students. Many are working for the PhD degree, awarded on the basis of individual research and requiring three years of full-time study. The Department of Geography also runs a range of Masters/MPhil courses.

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People in the Department

The Department's staff publish regularly in hundreds of separate publications, and attract research funding from a wide variety of sources.

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Research groups

Research in the Department of Geography, arranged across six Thematic Research Groups and two Institutes, covers a broad range of topics, approaches, and sites of study. Our expertise, individually and in collaboration, is both conceptual and applied.

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Cambridge Geography tops Times Good University Guide

27th September, 2017

 

We are delighted to announce that the University of Cambridge Department of Geography has come top of the Geography and Environmental Science category in the Times Good University Guide 2018.

CCRU down under

17th November, 2017

 

Researchers from the Cambridge Coastal Research Unit have contributed to a successful Australian Research Council Discovery Project award led by Monash University in Melbourne, Australia.

This prestigious award (A$ 324k) will enable knowledge transfer and exchange between the two island nations to reduce vulnerability to sea level rise. The low elevation coastal zone contains 13% of the Australian population and is subject to intensive agriculture and urbanisation. Accelerating sea level rise is thus a major societal concern and its impacts on shorelines must be accurately determined. This Australian-UK collaboration aims to improve Australia's capacity to predict changing shoreline position with sea level rise, better understand the role of vegetation in foreshore stabilisation and identify under what conditions the shoreline might suddenly shift landwards.

Rising Tides bring innovation prize

17th November, 2017

 

Victoria Herrmann, a PhD student at the Scott Polar Research Institute and a Gates Cambridge Scholar, has won a prestigious US social entrepreneurship prize for a research project on US towns and cities at risk of partial submersion due to climate change.

Victoria's was one of 10 projects to scoop the JM Kaplan Fund Innovation Prize.

Her winning Rising Tides project will create a new online matchmaking platform that connects pro bono experts with climate-affected communities.

UK premiere for Natura Urbana - The Brachen of Berlin

17th November, 2017

 

Natura Urbana – the Brachen of Berlin (72 mins) written and directed by Matthew Gandy and Sandra Jasper will have its UK premiere at the London International Documentary Festival on Saturday 25 November 2018. The LIDF is London's oldest and largest documentary festival. The screening will be at 11:00, at The Archivist, N1 5ET. Individual tickets for this screening must be purchased in advance online.

In Natura Urbana the changing vegetation of Berlin serves as a parallel history to war-time destruction, geo-political division, and the newest phase of urban transformation. Natura Urbana takes us on a unique journey through Berlin ranging from the botanical microcosm of cracked paving stones to elaborate attempts to map the entire city in terms of its distinctive ecological zones.

View the trailer online.

New paper on inland advance of supraglacial lakes in Greenland under climatic warming

13th November, 2017

 

A new article by recently graduated undergraduate student Laura Gledhill (Downing College) and Scott Polar Research Institute PhD student Andrew Williamson explores the inland advance of supraglacial lakes in a north-western sector of the Greenland Ice Sheet under recent climatic warming. The paper, published recently in the Annals of Glaciology, is based on Laura's undergraduate dissertation, which Andrew supervised. Many congratulations to them both!

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  • 20th November 2017:
    Imperial Germany, Pax Britannica, and the Political Economy of the Gold Standard, 1871-1914. Details…
    Graduate Workshops in Economic and Social History
  • 23rd November 2017:
    Measuring landscape resilience: tephra, soil and spatial patterns. Details…
    Department of Geography - main Departmental seminar series
  • 23rd November 2017:
    Using 'big data' to explore household and family structures in England and Wales in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Details…
    Core Seminar in Economic and Social History
  • 27th November 2017:
    Building a Demographic Profile of Foreign Seamen in the British Navy, 1793-1815. Details…
    Graduate Workshops in Economic and Social History
  • 27th November 2017:
    Re/Fram/ing Geography: Fridtjof Nansen at the Royal Geographical Society c.1888-1914. Details…
    Histories, cultures, environments and politics research seminars - Scott Polar Research Institute
  • 28th November 2017:
    Conservation by Algorithm. Details…
    Political Ecology Group meetings
  • 29th November 2017:
    Geophysical observations on Larsen C Ice Shelf: characterising stability after Iceberg A68. Details…
    Scott Polar Research Institute - Physical Sciences Seminar
  • 30th November 2017:
    The slow death of Victorian liberal governmentality. Details…
    Department of Geography - Seminars in Cultural and Historical Geography
  • 30th November 2017:
    The Open City: its ethics and its design. Details…
    Department of Geography - main Departmental seminar series
  • 30th November 2017:
    Why Malthus wasn’t African. Reviewing explanations and implications of low population densities in pre-1900 Sub-Saharan Africa. Details…
    Core Seminar in Economic and Social History
  • More seminars…