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Department of Geography

 

Research seminars

Research seminars

Jump to: Main Departmental seminars | Cultural and Historical Geography | Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure | Conservation | Environmental Systems and Processes | Political ecology | Polar physical science | Circumpolar History and Public Policy (CHiPP) | Gender | Quaternary Discussion Group (QDG) | Reading groups

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Main Departmental seminar series

Main Departmental seminar series at the Department of Geography.

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Thursday 9th February 2017, 4.15pm - Professor Steve Hinchliffe, Geography and College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter
Pathological Lives: on the cosmopolitics of losing self-assurance
Venue: Small Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography, Downing Site

We live in resurgent microbial times. From the ‘volatile world of influenza viruses’ (WHO, 2015) to the circulation of antimicrobial genes across populations of bacteria, this is a bio-insecure world. It is a world where the smallest of organisms threatens the edifices of modern life (medicine, food production, infrastructures, mobility, freedoms, security and so on). In this paper I refer to two responses. First, there is the establishment of a common and singular good life, or One Health. Here, pathological lives are constructed as an outside threat to the norms of health and good life. Second, and in contrast, there is a cosmopolitics, wherein norms are questioned rather than re-established. Here, emergent microbes and circulating resistant genes are not so much a threat to good life as a ‘passing fright that scares self-assurance’ (Stengers 2005). They can help to generate a situation with power to make us think. In this second, cosmopolitical approach, pathological lives are not so much the problem, but are part of the solution. They require us to pursue a different common world, a common sensing that is open to the bewildering variety of what it means to be both in touch with and touched by ‘reality’ (Stengers 2009: 38).

# Tuesday 14th February 2017, 4.15pm - Didier Fassin, James Wolfensohn Professor of Social Science
Distinguished Visitor lecture
The Public Presence of the Social Sciences
Venue: Small Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography, Downing Site

Research is generally deemed to end with the publication of its results. What happens afterwards is implicitly viewed as the usual after-sales service of science. Yet the encounter with various audiences, the debates it raises and the new perspectives it opens can be regarded as an object of inquiry in its own right. The lecture will be a tentative analysis of the public afterlife of works in the social science, with a special emphasis on ethnography. It will not promote public social science but will examine what it is, the operations it entails, the questions it poses, the challenges and limitations it faces. It will be grounded in particular in the experience of the reception of and engagement related to recent works on urban policing and on the carceral condition.

# Wednesday 15th February 2017, 5.00pm - Didier Fassin, James Wolfensohn Professor of Social Science
Critique of Punitive Reason
Venue: Large Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography, Downing Site

Over the past three decades, almost all Western countries have developed increasingly severe policies against crime, leading to the skyrocketing of prison demographics, despite declining rates of the most serious ones. The punitive moment contemporary societies are going through invites us to a fundamental reflection on the reasons why we punish. The justification of punishment has indeed long been an important topic in moral philosophy and legal studies, with two major strands: utilitarianism and retributivism. On the basis of research conducted on police, justice and prison in France, the lecture will propose a critical examination of these theories.

# Wednesday 1st March 2017, 4.15pm - Dr Ben Anderson, Department of Geography, Durham University
Governing Events: Emergencies and the Fragile Promise of the State
Venue: Small Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography, Downing Site

What do events and conditions become when they are governed as emergencies? And how does the (neo)liberal ‘emergency state’ relate to and govern through events? Drawing on scenes from a genealogy of how emergencies have been governed in the UK since 1945, the paper will explore how emergencies, whether actual or anticipated, have served as affective and material occasions in which the hope and promise of the state is placed in question. Associated with the enactment of forms of mediatised acclamation and glorification as contemporary forms of sovereignty intensify in response to events, emergencies are also, at the same time, occasions in which the failed, delayed, or incompetent state materialises and the promise of the continuation or optimisation of life becomes fragile, fades or ends. The paper explores what this means for how we think about the state and its relation with events in the midst of multiple crises by honing in on a series of affective scenes in which a nervous ‘emergency state’ surfaces animated by doubt, worry, and concern; an exchange of letters between government departments as changes to emergency legislation are deliberated, a Parliamentary debate about emergency powers, a control room that has detected an anomaly, an exercise that appears to be going wrong.

# Thursday 9th March 2017, 4.15pm - Jeremy Purseglove
Taming The Flood
Venue: Small Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography, Downing Site

Abstract not available

Seminars in Cultural and Historical Geography

All seminars begin at 1pm and take place in the Hardy Building, Room 101 (unless otherwise stated), Department of Geography. All welcome!

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Thursday 16th February 2017, 1.00pm - Professor Lucy Bland, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge
Mixed race children of black GIs and British women born in WWII
Venue: Room 101, Hardy Building, Department of Geography

Abstract not available

The Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure - seminar series

Research seminar series run by the Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure.
The support of the Trevelyan Fund (Faculty of History) is gratefully acknowledged.

Sandwiches and fruit will be available from 12.45pm.

Convenors: Leigh Shaw-Taylor (lmws2@cam.ac.uk), Romola Davenport (rjd23@cam.ac.uk) and Alice Reid (alice.reid@geog.cam.ac.uk).

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Monday 23rd January 2017, 1.00pm - Diego Carnevale (Birkbeck)
Placing the dead in 18th century European metropolis: institutions, economy, beliefs
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Studying burials, broadly defined, allows a comprehensive perspective on the policies and practices adopted by early modern societies to satisfy an important need of the community. This need is material and immaterial at the same time: in fact, every city faced the attempt to reconcile logistical, economical, juridical, sanitary and spiritual requirements in properly disposing of the dead. Can we define as a “public” service the system of rules and means putted in place to satisfy this need?

Funerals and burials involved a large and diverse number of actors (government, city authorities, Church, confraternities, corporations, and many individuals such as artisans, undertakers, tradesmen, etc.) who worked according to a complex system of formal regulations and customary practices built around the need to give everyone a proper burial.

I will show how the interactions between these actors structured a service for the community in two urban realities of 18th century Europe: Naples and Paris. For most of the operators, such as the secular clergy, this activity was an important source of privileges and financial support, becoming a key element of their concrete action on urban space. Following the two examples of Naples and Paris, I will finally discuss the opportunity to extend the comparison to London during the same period.

# Monday 6th February 2017, 1.00pm - Carry van Lieshout (Cambridge)
Drainage and water supply in 18th century London
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 20th February 2017, 1.00pm - James Perry (Lancaster)
Foreign-born migrants in the Integrated Census Microdata, 1851-1911
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

Cambridge Conservation Seminars

The series is intended to provide a research and social focus for university lecturers, research staff and postgraduate students interested in conservation research. The primary aim is to inform university colleagues of what research is going on in different departments and to bring in high quality outside speakers. Equally, members of conservation organisations are welcome to attend. A key element is the opportunity after each talk to socialise with colleagues from different departments and organisations.

Generously funded by the CCI Strategic Initiative Fund
http://www.conservation.cam.ac.uk/

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Wednesday 25th January 2017, 5.00pm - Professor Martin Price, Perth College Chair of the UK MAB Committee Chairholder, UNESCO Chair in Sustainable Mountain Development Director, Centre for Mountain Studies
UNESCO biosphere reserves: concept, challenges and opportunities
Venue: Large Seminar Room, Level 1, The David Attenborough Building

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 1st February 2017, 5.00pm - David Rose, Department of Geography University of Cambridge
When does environmental science get used in policy and practice?
Venue: Large Seminar Room, Level 1, The David Attenborough Building

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 8th February 2017, 5.00pm - Christian Kull, Institut de géographie et durabilité Université de Lausanne
Lessons from plants that don’t stay put: Mendicant baobabs and acrobat acacias
Venue: Large Seminar Room, Level 1, The David Attenborough Building

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 15th February 2017, 5.00pm - Debbie Pain Director of Conservation, The Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust (WWT)
Sex, eggs and videotape: techniques in threatened bird conservation
Venue: Large Seminar Room, Level 1, The David Attenborough Building

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 22nd February 2017, 5.00pm - David Aldridge, Department of Zoology University of Cambridge
Conservation and invasive species in freshwater ecosystems
Venue: Large Seminar Room, Level 1, The David Attenborough Building

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 1st March 2017, 5.00pm - Amy Hinsley, Oxford Martin School University of Oxford
Understanding consumer demand in the wildlife trade
Venue: Large Seminar Room, Level 1, The David Attenborough Building

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 8th March 2017, 5.00pm - Jonathan Spencer, Head of Planning & Environment Forest Enterprise Forestry Commission
Change and necessity: forest resilience and conservation for the 21st century
Venue: Large Seminar Room, Level 1, The David Attenborough Building

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 15th March 2017, 5.00pm - Jane Hill, Department of Biology University of York
Ecological and evolutionary responses of species to climate change
Venue: Large Seminar Room, Level 1, The David Attenborough Building

Abstract not available

Environmental Systems and Processes - Department of Geography

Seminars within the Environmental Systems and Processes research group of the Department of Geography.

There are no forthcoming seminars at present. Please check back here later.

You may wish to view the archive of previous seminars.

Polar Physical Sciences

Quaternary Discussion Group (QDG)