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Department of Geography

 

Research seminars

Research seminars

Jump to: Main Departmental seminars | Cultural and Historical Geography | Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure | Conservation | Environmental Systems and Processes | Political ecology | Polar physical science | Circumpolar History and Public Policy (CHiPP) | Gender | Quaternary Discussion Group (QDG) | Reading groups

Directions to the Department are available.

Main Departmental seminar series

Main Departmental seminar series at the Department of Geography.

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Thursday 11th February 2016, 4.15pm - Professor Nigel Thrift, University of Warwick
Cities and the Anthropocene
Venue: Small Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography, Downing Site

Abstract not available

Seminars in Cultural and Historical Geography

All seminars begin at 1pm and take place in the Hardy Building, Room 101 (unless otherwise stated), Department of Geography. All welcome!

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Thursday 18th February 2016, 1.00pm - Dr Francesca Moore, University of Cambridge
Abortion: A Geographical History
Venue: Room 101, Hardy Building, Department of Geography

Abstract not available

# Thursday 25th February 2016, 1.00pm - Jason Dittmer, University College London
NATO Interoperability and Geopolitical Assemblages
Venue: Room 101, Hardy Building, Department of Geography

NATO has had, since its origins, a policy of attempting to
produce interoperability among its national militaries. In this paper I
examine the concept of interoperability through the lens of assemblage
theory, and look to the diplomatic sites and processes through which it is
negotiated. I then examine the two fields in which interoperability can be
seen to emerge: procedures and war materiel. These differing materialities
(of bodies, and of weapon systems) are key to how interoperability has
emerged over time in ways that shape both political subjectivities and the
form of international relations over time.

# Thursday 10th March 2016, 1.00pm - Kayleigh Garthwaite, Department of Geography, Durham University
Behaving badly? Perspectives on health inequalities in two socially contrasting neighbourhoods in North East England
Venue: Room 101, Hardy Building, Department of Geography

It is widely accepted that health inequalities – unfair, unjust differences in health determinants and outcomes within and between populations – have serious immediate and long-term negative impacts on individuals and societies. But what do lay people think about the social patterning of health? Stockton Borough, North East England, has the greatest inequality in male life expectancy in the country – and the gap is widening. A man living in the most deprived ward will live, on average, 17.3 years less than a man living two miles away in the least deprived ward. This paper presents emerging findings from ongoing, longitudinal multi-site intensive ethnographic research examining how health inequalities are embodied in lived experiences in two contrasting wards within the borough of Stockton-on-Tees. The project is focused on providing an interrogation of the nature of locality, place and community (both as a physical space or a social network) in the two contrasting areas, as well as an extensive and detailed examination of the physical, social and cultural context within which health inequalities manifest themselves and are experienced.

Overall, participants tended to explain health inequalities and the subsequent gap in life expectancy in terms of individual behaviours and attitudes, rather than social/structural conditions. Generally, participants from the affluent neighbourhood tended to focus on lifestyle choice, education, and generational transmission of values and ‘faulty’ behaviours. These findings are variable, however, in terms of an emphasis on structure versus individual agency. Although health behaviour was initially given initially as a potential explanation, particularly during ethnographic observation, participants did offer wider, structural explanations for inequality during in-depth interviews. Discussions amongst people living in the most deprived neighbourhood showed that they were very aware of the effect of relative poverty on their health, physically, emotionally, and socially. Some participants expressed anger and frustration when talking about their experiences, but equally, a sense of fatalism and hopelessness was present in the accounts of people living in the most deprived areas.

The Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure - seminar series

Research seminar series run by the Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure.
The support of the Trevelyan Fund (Faculty of History) is gratefully acknowledged.

Sandwiches and fruit will be available from 12.45pm.

Convenors: Leigh Shaw-Taylor (lmws2@cam.ac.uk), Romola Davenport (rjd23@cam.ac.uk) and Alice Reid (alice.reid@geog.cam.ac.uk).

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Monday 15th February 2016, 1.00pm - Joe Day (Cambridge Group, University of Cambridge)
A Match Made in...Middlesbrough? Migration and the Marriage Market in the Late Nineteenth Century
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

Cambridge Conservation Seminars

The series is intended to provide a research and social focus for university lecturers, research staff and postgraduate students interested in conservation research. The primary aim is to inform university colleagues of what research is going on in different departments and to bring in high quality outside speakers. Equally, members of conservation organisations are welcome to attend. A key element is the opportunity after each talk to socialise with colleagues from different departments and organisations.

Generously funded by the CCI Strategic Initiative Fund
http://www.conservation.cam.ac.uk/

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Wednesday 10th February 2016, 5.00pm - James Wood, Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge
Bats and Emerging Infectious Diseases: conflicting priorities between conservation and public health?
Venue: Large Seminar Room, Level 1, The David Attenborough Building

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 17th February 2016, 5.00pm - Rosie Woodroffe, Institute of Zoology, London
Hot dogs: understanding climate change impacts in a tropical mammal
Venue: Large Seminar Room, Level 1, The David Attenborough Building

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 24th February 2016, 5.00pm - Anna Nekaris, Primate Conservation, Oxford Brooks University
Why are slow lorises venomous and will this help or hinder their conservation?
Venue: Large Seminar Room, Level 1, The David Attenborough Building

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 2nd March 2016, 5.00pm - Richard Philips, British Antarctic Survey
Hook, line and extinction: can science save albatrosses from fisheries?
Venue: Large Seminar Room, Level 1, The David Attenborough Building

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 9th March 2016, 5.00pm - Humanitas Visiting Professor in Sustainability Studies, John Hopkins University
Impact Evaluation of Protected Areas: what do we know about impacts, moderators and mechanisms?
Venue: Large Seminar Room, Level 1, The David Attenborough Building

Abstract not available

Environmental Systems and Processes - Department of Geography

Seminars within the Environmental Systems and Processes research group of the Department of Geography.

There are no forthcoming seminars at present. Please check back here later.

You may wish to view the archive of previous seminars.

Polar Physical Sciences

Quaternary Discussion Group (QDG)