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Department of Geography

 

Research seminars

Research seminars

Jump to: Main Departmental seminars | Cultural and Historical Geography | Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure | Conservation | Environmental Systems and Processes | Political ecology | Polar physical science | Circumpolar History and Public Policy (CHiPP) | Gender | Quaternary Discussion Group (QDG) | Reading groups

Directions to the Department are available.

Main Departmental seminar series

Main Departmental seminar series at the Department of Geography.

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Thursday 5th February 2015, 4.15pm - Professor Melissa Leach, Institute of Development Studies
Ebola and beyond: Interlaced inequalities, unsustainabilities and insecurities in a global development era
Venue: Small Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography, Downing Site

As the Ebola crisis continues to unfold across West Africa and the international community belatedly but now intensely responds, bigger, broader questions arise beyond the immediate challenges on the ground. What does the Ebola crisis reveal about contemporary patterns of environment, health and development? What would it take to build more equal, sustainable and resilient societies and systems, so that the events we are seeing in 2014 do not happen again? Can this crisis provide a moment for reframing development, in the region and beyond? In order to understand the causes and consequences of this particular outbreak, and to prevent such disasters in the future, our attention must turn to why such outbreaks occur in the first place and why they often have such devastating impacts in some places and times and not in others. The magnitude and persistence of the current crisis has exposed the hazards of living in a highly interconnected yet inequitable global political and economic system, and the consequences that can emerge from underdevelopment and related ‘structural violence’. In turn, reflecting on these processes can help define future research and development priorities for a world where the risks of zoonotic disease emergence are growing.

# Thursday 26th February 2015, 4.15pm - Professor Richard Dawson, Earth Systems Engineering, Newcastle University
Adapting Cities and Their Infrastructure to Global Change: An Integrated Modelling Approach to Understand Risks and Tradeoffs
Venue: Small Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography, Downing Site

The urgent need to reconfigure urban areas to emit less pollution (including greenhouse gases), be more resilient to climate risks and more sustainable in general can be assisted by rigorous analysis of these complex systems. In this talk I shall present the Urban Integrated Assessment Framework (UIAF) that was developed initially as part of the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research Cities Programme and subsequently advanced via several other projects. The UIAF provides a consistent framework for analysis of greenhouse gas emissions and climate risks in the context of multiple drivers of long term change. A case study in London (U.K.) shows that risks from heatwaves, droughts and floods could more than double and CO2 emissions could rise 28% without adaptation and mitigation over the 21st century. Notably, socio-economic drivers are responsible for a greater proportion, compared to climate change, of increased weather risks. There are also trade-offs in climate risks, land use choices and energy demand from adaptation policies. The work highlights the need for portfolios of adaptation and mitigation options, providing the evidence to motivate climate-sensitive development in London. Finally, I shall consider the role of tools like the UIAF and their utility for informing spatial development strategies such as the London Plan after a placement at the Greater London Authority.

# Thursday 19th March 2015, 4.15pm - Dr Andy Merrifield, Murray Edwards College, University of Cambridge
Urban Participation and Possibility: The Shadow Citizenry and the Right to the City
Venue: Small Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography, Downing Site

In 1989, Henri Lefebvre voiced the hypothesis that the right to the city was nothing more than a “new revolutionary concept of citizenship.” He implied revolutionary citizenship is not a right: it has to be taken, recreated anew, struggled for—not rubber-stamped. Today’s revolutionary citizens are citizens without rights, disenfranchised urban citizens the world over. Revolutionary citizens carry SHADOW PASSPORTS. Our shadow passports express a citizenship waiting in the wings, a solidarity haunting the mainstream, floating through frontiers, across designated checkpoints, sometimes even straying between academic disciplines. For holders of shadow passports, homeland securities and border control agencies know nothing about our true identities; and official maps rarely tell us where to go: they’re useless in helping us re-orientate ourselves, in helping us find ourselves, in helping us discover one another. This paper investigates, and tries to put a fresh spin on Lefebvre right to the city thesis and on the possibilities for participatory democracy.

Seminars in Cultural and Historical Geography

All seminars begin at 1pm and take place in the Hardy Building, Room 101 (unless otherwise stated), Department of Geography. All welcome!

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Thursday 19th February 2015, 1.00pm - Ruth Craggs (King’s College London)
British New Towns, decolonisation, and the global geographies of urban expertise
Venue: Room 101, Hardy Building, Department of Geography

Abstract not available

# Thursday 26th February 2015, 1.00pm - Emily O’Gorman (Macquarie University)
The invention of wetlands: histories of conservation and contestation from Australia
Venue: Room 101, Hardy Building, Department of Geography

Abstract not available

# Thursday 5th March 2015, 1.00pm - Carl Griffin (University of Sussex)
Geography’s final imperial frontier? On the influence of Geography on the humanities' 'spatial turn'
Venue: Room 101, Hardy Building, Department of Geography

Abstract not available

The Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure - seminar series

Research seminar series run by the Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure.
The support of the Trevelyan Fund (Faculty of History) is gratefully acknowledged.

**Sandwiches and fruit will be available from 12.45pm**

Convenors: Leigh Shaw-Taylor (lmws2@cam.ac.uk), Romola Davenport (rjd23@cam.ac.uk) and Alice Reid (alice.reid@geog.cam.ac.uk).

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Monday 2nd February 2015, 1.00pm - Hannaliis Jaadla (Tallinn University)
The impact of water supply and sanitation on infant mortality in Tartu (Estonia), 1897-1900
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 9th February 2015, 1.00pm - Dr Paul Puschmann (University of Leuven)
Revisiting the Urban Graveyard Debate: An analysis of mortality differences between natives and migrants in North-Western European port cities: Antwerp, Rotterdam and Stockholm, 1850-1930
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 16th February 2015, 1.00pm - Professor Lloyd Bonfield (New York Law School)
'Give me your wealthy, and skilled': immigration policy in late seventeenth and early eighteenth century England
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 27th April 2015, 1.00pm - Dr Eric Schneider (University of Oxford)
The Influence of Infant Feeding and Disease Morbidity on Children's Growth: Evidence from the London Foundling Hospital, 1893-1919
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 1st June 2015, 1.00pm - Dr Isabelle Devos (Ghent University)
Title to be confirmed
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

Cambridge Conservation Seminars

The series is intended to provide a research and social focus for university lecturers, research staff and postgraduate students interested in conservation research. The primary aim is to inform university colleagues of what research is going on in different departments and to bring in high quality outside speakers. Equally, members of conservation organisations are welcome to attend. A key element is the opportunity after each talk to socialise with colleagues from different departments and organisations.

Generously funded by the CCI Strategic Initiative Fund
http://www.conservation.cam.ac.uk/

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Wednesday 28th January 2015, 5.00pm - Dr Robyn Veal, Dept of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of Cambridge
Where did plant diversity and sustainability begIn? Arboriculture in the ancient Roman world
Venue: Large Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography, Downing Site

Diversity and sustainability are often thought of as modern concepts, yet in the classical world, exotic plant types were valued and the Romans in particular, had a penchant for collecting various foods, especially fruits from Asia, and domesticating them. Grafting techniques were sophisticated. Further, with a population of ca. 1 million people in 2nd century Rome, provision of fuel for cooking and heating was a major concern. This presentation will consider how and why the Roman political economy enabled trade and exchange in plant materials, and how the concept of fuel ‘sustainability’ may be studied in the ancient world. As we exhaust our fossil fuels in the modern world and move back to wood, among other fuel types, ancient practices may hold some resonance.

# Wednesday 4th February 2015, 5.00pm - Dr Zoe Davies, University of Kent
Biodiversity and the feel good factor
Venue: Large Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography, Downing Site

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 11th February 2015, 5.00pm - Professor Katherine Homewood, UCL
Evaluating the social and ecological outcomes of conservation interventions: Tanzania¹s Wildlife Management Areas
Venue: Large Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography, Downing Site

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 18th February 2015, 5.00pm - Dr Valerie Kapos, UNEP-WCMC
Title to be confirmed
Venue: Large Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography, Downing Site

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 25th February 2015, 5.00pm - Professor Georgina Mace, UCL
Title to be confirmed
Venue: Large Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography, Downing Site

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 4th March 2015, 5.00pm - Dr Ivan Scales, Dept of Geography, University of Cambridge
Title to be confirmed
Venue: Large Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography, Downing Site

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 4th March 2015, 5.00pm - Dr Ivan Scales, Dept of Geography, University of Cambridge
Title to be confirmed
Venue: Large Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography, Downing Site

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 11th March 2015, 5.00pm - Professor Jens-Christian Svenning, Aarhus University
Title to be confirmed
Venue: Large Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography, Downing Site

Abstract not available

Environmental Systems and Processes - Department of Geography

Seminars within the Environmental Systems and Processes research group of the Department of Geography.

There are no forthcoming seminars at present. Please check back here later.

You may wish to view the archive of previous seminars.

Polar Physical Sciences

Quaternary Discussion Group (QDG)