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Department of Geography

 

Research seminars

Research seminars

Jump to: Main Departmental seminars | Cultural and Historical Geography | Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure | Conservation | Environmental Systems and Processes | Political ecology | Polar physical science | Circumpolar History and Public Policy (CHiPP) | Gender | Quaternary Discussion Group (QDG) | Cambridge Volcanology | Cambridge Cultural and Historical Geography | Graduate Workshops in Economic and Social History | Other talks | Reading groups

Directions to the Department are available.

Main Departmental seminar series

Main Departmental seminar series at the Department of Geography.

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Wednesday 1st March 2017, 4.15pm - Dr Ben Anderson, Department of Geography, Durham University
Governing Events: Emergencies and the Fragile Promise of the State
Venue: Small Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography, Downing Site

What do events and conditions become when they are governed as emergencies? And how does the (neo)liberal ‘emergency state’ relate to and govern through events? Drawing on scenes from a genealogy of how emergencies have been governed in the UK since 1945, the paper will explore how emergencies, whether actual or anticipated, have served as affective and material occasions in which the hope and promise of the state is placed in question. Associated with the enactment of forms of mediatised acclamation and glorification as contemporary forms of sovereignty intensify in response to events, emergencies are also, at the same time, occasions in which the failed, delayed, or incompetent state materialises and the promise of the continuation or optimisation of life becomes fragile, fades or ends. The paper explores what this means for how we think about the state and its relation with events in the midst of multiple crises by honing in on a series of affective scenes in which a nervous ‘emergency state’ surfaces animated by doubt, worry, and concern; an exchange of letters between government departments as changes to emergency legislation are deliberated, a Parliamentary debate about emergency powers, a control room that has detected an anomaly, an exercise that appears to be going wrong.

# Thursday 9th March 2017, 4.15pm - Jeremy Purseglove
Taming The Flood
Venue: Small Lecture Theatre, Department of Geography, Downing Site

Jeremy Purseglove, landscape architect, ecologist and drainage engineer, considers the history of UK flood management and the evolution of the modern farmed landscape. How do we enhance, rather than destroy, our wetlands, making space for water so that we don’t continue to get ‘flooded out’?

Seminars in Cultural and Historical Geography

All seminars begin at 1pm and take place in the Hardy Building, Room 101 (unless otherwise stated), Department of Geography. All welcome!

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Thursday 16th March 2017, 1.00pm - Tim Brown, Queen Mary University of London
Making Imperial Citizens: Barnardo’s and the Preparation and Care of Child Emigrants, 1882-1905
Venue: Room 101, Hardy Building, Department of Geography

Abstract not available

The Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure - seminar series

Research seminar series run by the Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure.
The support of the Trevelyan Fund (Faculty of History) is gratefully acknowledged.

Sandwiches and fruit will be available from 12.45pm.

Convenors: Leigh Shaw-Taylor (lmws2@cam.ac.uk), Romola Davenport (rjd23@cam.ac.uk) and Alice Reid (alice.reid@geog.cam.ac.uk).

There are no forthcoming seminars at present. Please check back here later.

You may wish to view the archive of previous seminars.

Cambridge Conservation Seminars

The series is intended to provide a research and social focus for university lecturers, research staff and postgraduate students interested in conservation research. The primary aim is to inform university colleagues of what research is going on in different departments and to bring in high quality outside speakers. Equally, members of conservation organisations are welcome to attend. A key element is the opportunity after each talk to socialise with colleagues from different departments and organisations.

Generously funded by the CCI Strategic Initiative Fund
http://www.conservation.cam.ac.uk/

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Wednesday 1st March 2017, 5.00pm - Amy Hinsley, Oxford Martin School University of Oxford
Understanding consumer demand in the wildlife trade
Venue: Large Seminar Room, Level 1, The David Attenborough Building

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 8th March 2017, 5.00pm - Jonathan Spencer, Head of Planning & Environment Forest Enterprise Forestry Commission
Change and necessity: forest resilience and conservation for the 21st century
Venue: Large Seminar Room, Level 1, The David Attenborough Building

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 15th March 2017, 5.00pm - Jane Hill, Department of Biology University of York
Ecological and evolutionary responses of species to climate change
Venue: Large Seminar Room, Level 1, The David Attenborough Building

Abstract not available

Environmental Systems and Processes - Department of Geography

Seminars within the Environmental Systems and Processes research group of the Department of Geography.

There are no forthcoming seminars at present. Please check back here later.

You may wish to view the archive of previous seminars.

Polar Physical Sciences

Quaternary Discussion Group (QDG)

A series of 50 minute lectures, followed by discussion, on the broad topic of environmental evolution, climate, ecological and human change during the Quaternary (the last ~2.6 million years). The lectures are aimed at a broad audience (including geoscientists, glaciologists, environmental scientists, atmospheric chemists, biologists, anthropologists and archaeologists).

Seminars are usually held on Thursdays starting at 17:30 in Clare College in the Thirkill Room (far left corner of first court) or the Latimer Room (on the left in the first court).

Wine is usually served after the talks and there is time for discussion over drinks and/or dinner after the seminar, which should last approximately 1 hour. The meetings are currently organised by Rachael Rhodes (rhr34@cam.ac.uk; Godwin Laboratory for Palaeoclimate Research, Department of Earth Sciences), and Della Murton (dkf20@cam.ac.uk; Department of Geography). Please feel free to contact the organisers with queries and suggestions.

A map showing the position of Clare College is available at http://www.clare.cam.ac.uk/Maps-and-Directions/

Please remember to check regularly for updates.

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Thursday 23rd February 2017, 5.30pm - Francis Wenban-Smith, Archaeology, University of Southampton
MIS 7, the "Ebbsfleet Interglacial": sub-stage structure and recognition in the UK record
Venue: Latimer Room (Old Court), Clare College, Trinity Lane

More than 20 UK Quaternary sites are reliably related to MIS 7 of the global marine isotope stage framework. This interglacial has a distinctive O18:O16 profile of an early warm peak (MIS 7e) followed by a well-defined cooler episode (MIS 7d), which is followed in turn by a double warm peak (MIS 7c and MIS 7a) divided by a minor cool episode (MIS 7b). Foremost among UK MIS 7 sites is the Ebbsfleet Valley, a minor tributary on the south side of the Thames estuary. Here, approximately half a dozen separate localities have provided evidence of sequences from MIS 7, ranging from localities first investigated in the 1930s to currently-unpublished localities investigated as part of the HS1 archaeological programme. When the disparate palaeo-environmental, litho-stratigraphic and dating evidence from these Ebbsfleet localities is considered as a whole, a picture emerges in which all three warm MIS 7 peaks can be recognised and distinguished from each other, and their distinctive palaeo-environmental and biostratigraphic characteristics can thus provide the framework within which other UK sites should be integrated.

# Thursday 9th March 2017, 5.30pm - Thomas Chalk, National Oceanography Centre, Southampton
Causes of ice-age intensification across the Mid-Pleistocene Transition, insights from a new boron isotope CO2 record
Venue: Latimer Room (Old Court), Clare College, Trinity Lane

This talk is part of the Quaternary Discussion Group (QDG).

# Thursday 4th May 2017, 5.30pm - Chris Stokes, Durham University
How ice sheets collapse: a lesson from the past
Venue: Cripps Auditorium, Cripps Court, Magdalene College

Abstract not available

# Thursday 18th May 2017, 5.30pm - Shaun Marcott, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Title to be confirmed
Venue: Cripps Auditorium, Cripps Court, Magdalene College

Abstract not available

Cambridge Volcanology

Cambridge Volcanology seminars.

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Monday 6th March 2017, 5.30pm - Tamsin Mather, Oxford
Lessons from a restless caldera: multi-parameter studies to understand the past, present and future of volcanic activity at Santorini volcano, Greece
Venue: Harker Room 1, Department of Earth Sciences

Understanding the behavior of magma and hydrothermal fluids at restless calderas is important for many reasons. The interplay between the magmatic and hydrothermal systems at caldera-forming volcanoes is key to interpreting many of the geophysical signals measured at the surface used to understand their subsurface state and structure. Several recent studies have highlighted that structural controls may be important in terms of the movements of both types of fluids in the Earth’s crust below volcanoes with implications including hazard management and geothermal prospecting. Caldera-forming systems are often characterized by eruptive activity covering a wide range of size scales and repose intervals. Understanding how these different scales of volcanism at the same system relate to each other is a key science challenge when seeking to understand these types of volcano. This presentation will explore these issues using examples from the caldera-forming system Santorini volcano, Greece. This is a relatively well-studied system that last erupted significantly about 75 years ago and has recently experienced a period of unusual unrest. Lessons from field mapping and geochemistry, high-resolution digital elevation models, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) and degassing surveys and compositions can be brought together to yield insights into the behavior of this and similar volcanic systems.

All welcome to attend, free for members of the Sedgwick Club, £2 for non-members. Refreshments provided!

# Wednesday 8th March 2017, 1.00pm - Amy Donovan (UCL)
The 2011 Nabro eruption
Venue: Harker 2, Earth Sciences Department

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 26th April 2017, 1.00pm - Peter Baxter (University of Cambridge)
Masterclass: The health impacts of volcanic gases
Venue: Harker 2, Earth Sciences Department

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 10th May 2017, 1.00pm - Davide Novella (University of Cambridge)
The distribution of oxygen in the Earth’s mantle
Venue: Harker 2, Earth Sciences Department

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 24th May 2017, 1.00pm - Marian Holness (University of Cambridge)
Masterclass: Crystal growth kinetics
Venue: Harker 2, Earth Sciences Department

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 7th June 2017, 1.00pm - Adam Bobbette (University of Cambridge)
Cultures of Forecasting on Mt. Merapi
Venue: Harker 2, Earth Sciences Department

Abstract not available

Cambridge Cultural and Historical Geography - Department of Geography

Seminars and public lectures within the Cambridge Cultural and Historical Geography research group of the Department of Geography.

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Monday 27th February 2017, 12.30pm - Speaker to be confirmed
MPhil Presentations Part I
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Thursday 2nd March 2017, 5.00pm - John Morgan (University of Manchester)
Storm surges and state formation in early modern England: coping with flooding in coastal and lowland Lincolnshire
Venue: History Faculty Room 12

Recurrent flooding was a condition of life in low and wet grounds. Erecting dams, scouring ditches and laying drains consumed significant amounts of labour time and money, as the profitability of agriculture rested on maintaining appropriate water levels. The success of one farmer was reliant on another, requiring complex co-ordination and administration. I will outline how flood protection was provisioned, its costs and their impact.

# Monday 6th March 2017, 12.30pm - Speaker to be confirmed
MPhil Presentations Part II
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Friday 10th March 2017, 10.00am - Andrew Barry (UCL), Nigel Clark (Lancaster)
Please note the adjusted time - starting 10am
CCHG series: Political Geology Workshop
Venue: Seminar Room, Department of Geography

The emerging interest in political geology within geography has opened up exciting possibilities for rethinking the intersections of geology with society and politics. While it has emerged in conversation with the traditions of political ecology and geopolitics, it lay its stress on the geological as such. It is about the rocks, minerals, crust, and dust at the centre of politics and society. It looks at how they are wrapped together, torn apart, and set in motion through each other. It’s concern is with how lively geologies like volcanoes and earthquakes gather political contestation and dreams around them, how the cracks in stone walls fold in property law and the precarious careers of shady mayors. Geologists too are part of this story because they are political operators not only for energy companies and the extractive industries but also the neo-liberal knowledge machines of universities. If they were the 19th century story tellers of the Terrans and the terrestrial long durée, time-frame shattering priests, what myths of the earth do geologists tell today? How do they and others carry rocks, smuggle and transform them into pictures and maps, the formation of groups, make them public and fight over them? And what of the practices that refuse to let rocks, the ground, our mineral brothers and sisters, be dead, but instead violent, angry, sometimes gentle but usually sneaky players in struggles against an all too human politics. Who lets the geos resist Man-the-Political-Animal surrounded by the natural world like it’s a theatre backdrop? Political geology puts the geos back in the geopolitics. It collapses the scenography and lets the world in.

# Thursday 16th March 2017, 1.00pm - Tim Brown, Queen Mary University of London
Making Imperial Citizens: Barnardo’s and the Preparation and Care of Child Emigrants, 1882-1905
Venue: Room 101, Hardy Building, Department of Geography

Abstract not available

Graduate Workshops in Economic and Social History

All talks take place on Mondays at 12.30 pm in Room 5, Faculty of History, West Road.

Convenors: Alex Wakelam (amfw2) and Jacopo Sartori (js2214).

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Monday 27th February 2017, 12.30pm - Speaker to be confirmed
MPhil Presentations Part I
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 6th March 2017, 12.30pm - Speaker to be confirmed
MPhil Presentations Part II
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

Other talks

Talks in the Department of Geography not connected to any other seminar series.

There are no forthcoming seminars at present. Please check back here later.

You may wish to view the archive of previous seminars.