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Hannaliis Jaadla

Hannaliis Jaadla

Research Associate

Historical demography

Biography

Career

  • 2014-2015: Research assistant, Department of Sociology, University of Oxford
  • 2013-2015: Teaching assistant, School of Governance, Law and Society, Estonian Institute for Population Studies, Tallinn University

Qualifications

  • 2017: PhD in Demography, School of Governance, Law and Society, Estonian Institute for Population Studies, Tallinn University
  • 2013: European Master in Demography, Centre for Demographic Studies, Autonomous University of Barcelona - European Doctoral School of Demography
  • 2010: MA in History, Institute of History and Archaeology, University of Tartu
  • 2007: BA in History, Institute of History and Archaeology, University of Tartu

Research

My main research interests are on demographic processes in the 19th century with a special focus on mortality development in urban areas. My research until now has focused on infant mortality and its relationship with public health improvements in the late 19th century and on socio-economic mortality differences in Estonia.
Currently, I'm involved in the 'An Atlas of Fertility Decline in England and Wales' project. As a part of this project, I am helping with child mortality and fertility estimation at fine geographical scale to understand the relationship between the two, as well as the wider geographical diffusion process of fertility decline from 1850 to 1911.

Publications

  • Jaadla, H., Puur, A., & Rahu, K. (2017). Socio-economic and cultural differentials in mortality in a late-nineteenth-century urban setting: a linked records study from Tartu, Estonia, 1897–1900. Demographic Research, 36 (1), 1–40.
  • Jaadla, H., & Puur, A. (2016). The impact of water supply and sanitation on infant mortality: Individual-level evidence from Tartu, Estonia, 1897–1900. Population Studies, 70 (2), 163–179.
  • Jaadla, H., & Klesment, M. (2014). Infant mortality in the Lutheran population of Tartu at the end of the nineteenth century. The Estonian Historical Journal, 2/3 (148/149), 139–172.