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David Beckingham

David Beckingham

College Lecturer, Sidney Sussex College

My research uses the regulation of drinking and drunkenness to examine the geography of liberal government in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Biography

Qualifications

  • PhD, 2009, University of Cambridge, 'The regulation of drunkenness in nineteenth-century Liverpool'
  • MPhil, 2005, University of Cambridge
  • BA, 2004, University of Cambridge

Research

My research explores the relationship between liberal government and the regulation of alcohol and intemperance in a variety of different home and colonial contexts. I draw on research in cultural, historical, medical and legal geography to examine:

  • how licensing policy influenced the management of British licensed premises and the habits of drinkers;
  • the drafting and implementation of legislation to deal with inebriates and inebriety;
  • the geography of temperance;
  • the significance of alcohol in the development of child protection policy.

I am working on a monograph for Liverpool University Press that examines Liverpool's status as one of the most drunken cities in Victorian Britain.

My ongoing research also includes an examination of the relationship between alcoholism and mental health in the early years of the twentieth century, which I would like to extend into a consideration of eugenics. And I am also writing about the regulation of drinking during World War One. Common to all these projects is an interest in the tests and crises of liberal government.

Publications

Papers

Book chapters

Other

Conference and seminar papers

  • Law as urban assemblage: Liquor licensing in WWI Motherwell, Scotland, Annual Meeting of the Association of American Geographers, Chicago, April 2015.
  • Public drinking and public control, Public drinking in the nineteenth century, University of Bristol, February 2014.
  • Under whose control? Banning the barmaid in early twentieth century Glasgow, Under Control: Alcohol and Drug Regulation, Past and Present, London, June 2013.
  • 'The Magistrates and the Barmaids': The geographies of licensing in 1900s Glasgow, Royal Geographical Society Annual International Conference, Edinburgh, July 2012.
  • Between inebriety and insanity: The treatment of drunkenness in Scotland, 1879-1914, Royal Geographical Society Annual International Conference, Edinburgh, July 2012.
  • The Lure of Local Control: Scandinavian Licensing Reform and British Temperance Elites, European Social Science History Conference, Glasgow, April 2012.
  • Towards a genealogy of care: The treatment of Scotland's inebriates, Seminars in Cultural and Historical Geography, Department of Geography, University of Cambridge, November 2011.
  • Child protection and the legal geographies of the Victorian home, Annual Meeting of the Association of American Geographers, Seattle, April 2011.
  • Gender, space and drunkenness, Intoxicants and intoxication in cultural and historical perspective, Cambridge, July 2010.
  • Liberalism, liberty and the geography of the Inebriates Acts, 1879-1914, London Group of Historical Geographers, January 2010.
  • The 'fetish of personal liberty': drunkenness, liberal government, and the geography of the Inebriates Acts, 1879-1914, Departmental Research Seminar, Queen Mary, London, November 2009.
  • Crime, cartography and the geo-coding of dangerous behaviours, Mapping Dangerous Spaces, British Library, London, June 2009.
  • Father Theobald Mathew's temperance geographies, Conference of Irish Geographers, Cork, May 2009.
  • The moral geography of drunkenness, Modern British and European Roundtable Seminar, Faculty of History, Oxford, February 2009.
  • Liverpool - 'capital of the binge culture', Conference of Liverpool and Merseyside Studies, Liverpool, November 2008.
  • Loyalty, temperance and the Liverpool Irish, 1847 - c.1900, Conference of Irish Geographers, Liverpool, May 2008.
  • Imperial liberalism and temperance: from Liverpool to India, Annual Meeting of the Association of American Geographers, Boston, April 2008.
  • Drinking and drunkenness, temperance, and cultures of resistance in nineteenth-century Liverpool, European Social Science History Conference, Lisbon, February 2008.
  • Cartography as a tool of social reform: drink maps of nineteenth-century Liverpool, Cambridge Seminars in the History of Cartography, Emmanuel College, Cambridge, October 2007.
  • 'The massacre of the innocents': the problem of maternal drunkenness, c.1860-WWI', Parenting: An Interdisciplinary Workshop, Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities, Cambridge, July 2007.
  • Discounting drunkenness: regulating 'demon-drink' in nineteenth-century Liverpool, Seminars in Cultural and Historical Geography, Department of Geography, University of Cambridge, May 2007.
  • Drinking race: governmentality, policing, and Irish drunkenness, Annual Meeting of the Association of American Geographers, San Francisco, April 2007.
  • Geographies of drink culture in Liverpool: lessons from the drink capital of nineteenth-century England, Royal Geographical Society Annual International Conference, London, August 2006.
  • Regulating the spaces of sexual and parasexual citizenship in turn of the century Liverpool, European Social Science History Conference, Amsterdam, March 2006.

Teaching

  • Geographical Tripos Part IA, Human Geography: section co-ordinator of Cultural Geography lectures
  • Geographical Tripos Part IB, Cities, Citizenship and Civil Society; Human Geography Methods; joint leader of Dublin field trip
  • Geographical Tripos Part II, Geographies of Discipline and Social Regulation

External activities