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# Lectureship vacancy

The Department is currently advertising a fixed-term Lectureship in Human Geography, to start on 1st October 2015. The successful candidate will have broad interests in the area of development studies, with particular emphasis in urban, environmental, social and/or post-colonial geographies. See more information and how to apply online.

# Journeys that show John was our king of the road

Journeys that show John was our king of the road

The Times features a full-page article ('Journeys that show John was our king of the road', 10th June 2015) about research undertaken by members of the Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure.

Max Satchell and Ellen Potter used GIS to map the locations of John, Henry III, and Edward I from place and date clauses of thousands of royal letters and charters from 1199 to 1305. This created extremely detailed itineraries, enabling the day to day movements of each king to be reconstructed. By tracking the movements of King John and his successors through England and Wales it is possible to learn a great deal about medieval transport and travel.

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# Trinity College Geography Event

Trinity College will be hosting a Geography recruitment event on Friday 3 July (11.00-12.15). Dr Nick Cutler, College Lecturer in Geography and an Admissions Tutor at Churchill College, will talk about the undergraduate Geography course at Cambridge. He will give guidance on preparing a competitive application and answer questions about the Cambridge admissions process. After the event, attendees will be able to participate in the tours and lectures organised by the Geography Department as part of the University Open Day. If you would like to attend, please email admissions@trin.cam.ac.uk.

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# Progress in Geography Conference for Sixth Form Students

Progress in Geography Conference for Sixth Form Students

Fitzwilliam College holds an annual one-day conference for Sixth Form students intending to study Geography at University, and for their teachers. This popular conference aims to update lower Sixth Formers and teachers on current issues in geographical research - and to provide potential applicants with an opportunity to visit one of the leading colleges for Geography in the University. This year, the conference will take place on Monday 22 June 2015.

The conference runs from 10.30 to 16.30 in the College Auditorium. The conference consists of a series of 45-minute sessions on topical subjects in Geography, with plenty of time allowed for discussion. During breaks and lunch, conference attendees have the opportunity to meet Fellows who teach Geography at Fitzwilliam, as well as current Geography students. There are 150 places available, allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. Bookings can be made via the College website.

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# Undergraduate Open Days 2015

Undergraduate Open Days 2015

This year's open days will be on Thursday 2nd & Friday 3rd July 2015.

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# Dr Charlotte Lemanski awarded Royal Geographical Society Award

Dr Charlotte Lemanski awarded Royal Geographical Society Award

Dr Charlotte Lemanski has been awarded the Royal Geographical Society Gill Memorial Award for early-career achievement in the field of urban geography.

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# After the Iron curtain: Poor parenting and state intervention in cross cultural perspective: a one-day workshop

After the Iron curtain: Poor parenting and state intervention in cross cultural perspective: a one-day workshop

This workshop, on Wednesday June 10th 2015, is concerned with the issue of 'poor' parenting in cross-cultural perspective, and particularly a UK comparison with post-Soviet countries. Taken at face value, the concept of 'poor' parenting may look very different in countries with different political, ideological and socio-economic structures such as liberal democracies of the UK and the US, yet one study has revealed some (tentative) similarities in child welfare practices. This workshop problematizes the concept of 'poor' parenting by making it an analytical concept and placing it in a comparative context, asking three main questions: (1) What constitutes 'poor' parenting in a particular country? (2) What are the underlying concepts of childhood and parenthood this relies on? (3) What are the similarities in child welfare practices, and how do we account for these?

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# Visit SPRI Prints

Visit SPRI Prints

The Scott Polar Research Institute is pleased to offer high quality prints from our unique collection. Images are available in various sizes, framed or unframed. Visit SPRIPrints.com.

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# Trinity College geography essay competition

Trinity College's annual Geography Essay Competition is now open to entrants. The competition is open to Year 12 students in UK schools. Essays should be on the following topic: "At a fundamental level, geography is the study of places. What is the most important place in the world, and why?"

Further details are available from the Trinity College website. Potential entrants can also contact Nick Cutler, the College's Director of Studies in Geography, for guidance. The closing date for entries is 30 June 2015.

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# New study highlights the role of forests in addressing hunger

New study highlights the role of forests in addressing hunger

A new study, led by Dr Bhaskar Vira, and launched at the United Nations Forum on Forests meeting in New York, highlights the importance of forests and trees in responses to global hunger. More than 60 global scientists and experts (including Dr Chris Sandbrook from the Department) collaborated on the peer-reviewed publication "Forests, Trees and Landscapes for Food Security and Nutrition: A Global Assessment Report", which was coordinated by the International Union of Forest Research Organisations (IUFRO) on behalf of the Collaborative Partnership on Forests (CPF). The report underlines the need for the most vulnerable groups in society to have secure access to forest foods. Although forests are not a panacea for global hunger, the report emphasizes that they play a vital role in complementing crops produced on farms. This is especially important when the staple food supply is impaired by droughts, volatile prices, armed conflicts, or other crises.

The study comes in the lead up to the United Nations' finalization of the Sustainable Development Goals, designed to address, among other global challenges, poverty and hunger. The report also provides useful insight into how the UN can respond to the "Zero Hunger Challenge," which aims to eliminate global hunger by 2025. Bhaskar has written a short blog on the key findings of the report, and the findings have been widely reported in the media, including the BBC.

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