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Undergraduate study

Geography is one of the most exciting subjects to study at university. We live in an interdependent world caught up in chains of events which span the globe. We depend upon an increasingly fragile physical environment, whose complex interactions require sophisticated analysis and sensitive management.

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Graduate study

The Department has a large community of postgraduate students. Many are working for the PhD degree, awarded on the basis of individual research and requiring three years of full-time study. The Department of Geography also runs a range of Masters/MPhil courses.

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People in the Department

The Department's staff publish regularly in hundreds of separate publications, and attract research funding from a wide variety of sources.

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Research groups

Research in the Department of Geography, arranged in five thematic research groups, covers a broad range of topics, approaches, and sites of study. Our expertise is both conceptual and applied, and our goals as free ranging as policy oriented.

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Department of Geography hosts Distinguished Visitor Professor Don Mitchell

15th November, 2016

 

The Department of Geography is committed to bringing internationally renowned scholars to Cambridge, under our Distinguished Visitors Scheme. Our most recent guest was Professor Don Mitchell of the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University, who came to Cambridge for the first time in his career, giving a public lecture, a research seminar, and a graduate seminar. Professor Mitchell has made key contributions in a number of fields, particularly in cultural geography and cultural theory, in his focus on labour and the political economy of landscape, and in relation to struggles over urban public space. Continue reading …

Event: Geography and neo-vitalism

31st October, 2016

 

Matthew Gandy and Michael Bravo are holding a half-day workshop on the theme of "Geography and neo-vitalism" on Wednesday 23rd November. The neo-vitalist turn in geography raises many interesting questions across the discipline including connections with the geo-humanities and new fields of interdisciplinary scholarship. In recent years the works of Henri Bergson, Hans Driesch, and other thinkers have gained influence in debates over non-human agency, post-human subjectivities, and new concepts of nature. In this workshop we wish to bring together staff and graduate students with an interest in contemporary theoretical
debates for this half-day event.

Distinguished Visitor: Professor Don Mitchell

31st October, 2016

 

As part of the Distinguished Visitors Scheme, Professor Don Mitchell will be visiting the Department, from Tuesday 8th November to Thursday 10th November 2016. He is Distinguished Professor of Geography at the Maxwell School of Syracuse University). He will be giving a lecture ('Revolting New York: How Riots, Uprisings, and Revolutions Shape the Urban Landscape') and seminar ('Mean Streets: Homelessness, Public Space, and the Limits to Capital') - all welcome.

Here come the drones

21st October, 2016

 

The methods we use to teach physical geography and environmental science are rapidly changing. As a new generation of high-quality affordable drones creates a revolution in the way that schools collect, process and view landscape data, Dr Steve Boreham of the Department of Geography at the University of Cambridge takes us through the ins and outs of flying drones for research.

Policy Forum investigates the geography of the court system

5th October, 2016

 

A Policy Forum organised by Alex Jeffrey on 29th and 30th September 2016 and funded by an ESRC Impact Acceleration Award, brought together Judges, government officials, NGO representatives and academics to debate the implications of the re-organisation of the UK Court System. As trials are focused on fewer court buildings and digital technologies are enrolled by court users to facilitate access to justice, the debate focused on the role of court spaces in shaping judicial outcomes, the significance of courts as symbols of justice and the uneven adoption of technologies amongst court users.

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